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My jewelry acts as a communication device to bridge the tangible and intangible, digital and real. Xiangying Shi interviewed by Klimt02

Interview  /  Artists
Published: 17.05.2019
Xiangyin Shi Xiangyin Shi
Author:
Klimt02
Edited by:
Klimt02
Edited at:
Barcelona
Edited on:
2019
Xiangyin Shi. Brooch: Hey! Listen! #1 #2 #3, 2019. Sterling silver, copper, brass, mini speaker, wood, found objects, acrylic paint, steel (pin).. 7 x 5 x 4 cm. Photo by: Xiangyin Shi. From series: Digital Communication Jewelry. Xiangyin Shi
Brooch: Hey! Listen! #1 #2 #3, 2019
Sterling silver, copper, brass, mini speaker, wood, found objects, acrylic paint, steel (pin).
7 x 5 x 4 cm
Photo by: Xiangyin Shi
From series: Digital Communication Jewelry
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Since primary school, animation has always been my best friend. It cheers me up in loneliness and darkness, creating a comfort zone for my therapy. More specifically, it is Otaku subculture including animation, comics, games and novels that encourages and inspires me as an artist. Personally, I want to convey this kind of joy and happiness into my jewelry, cheering more people up.
What's local and universal in your artistic work?
I grew up in the digital age, and my childhood was full of animation, cartoons, and comics. As the only child in my family, I didn’t have many friends to talk to or play with. Since primary school, animation has always been my best friend. It cheers me up in loneliness and darkness, creating a comfort zone for my therapy. More specifically, it is Otaku subculture including animation, comics, games, and novels that encourages and inspires me as an artist. Personally, I want to convey this kind of joy and happiness into my jewelry, cheering more people up.
For a more universal understanding, Otaku subculture is a part of digital culture that relates to everybody. The internet and digital world open wider relations, develop richer identities and create closer communities both online and offline. The digital world in this way offers more understanding and more sense of belonging than the real world, healing people from loneliness and depression. Taking this advantage, my jewelry acts as a communication device to bridge the tangible and intangible, digital and real. Further, it encourages people to make their own noise, find their true selves, and embrace their human nature.


What do you expect when you show your work to the public (for example, with an exhibition)?
At first glance, I want to make people happy and laugh, refreshing people with my sense of humor in their daily routine.  Looking deeper, I want my audiences to get more understanding of Otaku subculture and enjoy the power of the digital world.


How important is handmade for you in your development? What role does technics and technology play in your development?
I like the beauty of the human touch. Even if it is not as perfect as a computer’s work, it shows the soul of a maker. I fabricate all the metal parts by hand, as it shows the value of my work. However, technology is also important to me, and I use many electric components in my pieces, such as speakers, cameras and remote cars. I think handmade is the foundation of my work, while technology lights up my pieces.


When you start making a new piece what is your process? How much of it is a pre-formulated plan and how much do you let the material spontaneity lead you?
I find the objects and materials first, then based on the concept I come up with my design. Basically, I don’t have a complete plan before starting a new piece. I always let the materials lead me to a further step.


How important is wearability in contemporary jewellery? And in your pieces?
I think contemporary jewelry does not need to be wearable. As long as it relates to the human body, it can be everything. In my collection, my jewelry has alternative forms. More than wearable jewelry, it can be an interactive object that is playful or virtual jewelry that exists digitally.


The last work, book, film, city that moved me was...
Shanghai, I think it is the center of Otaku subculture in China. I go to Shanghai several times each year for animation festivals and to visit Otaku shops.


What is your source to get information?
For my Otaku inspirations, I mainly get and exchange information on a website called BILIBILI.


Considering the experiences you have had over the years - if you could go back and give yourself a piece of advice for the start-up phase, what would that be?
Never be too shy to show your interests, even if it might be weird for the mainstream.


Can you describe your personality in 3 words, describe your work in 3 words.
Personality: organized, decisive, low key.
Work: joyful, playful, high-tech.
 
Xiangyin Shi. Object: Your Food Is Ready, 2019. Sterling silver, copper, wifi car, found objects, acrylic paint, acrylic sheet.. 15 x 5 x 7 cm. Photo by: Xiangyin Shi. From series: Digital Communication Jewelry. Detail view.. Xiangyin Shi
Object: Your Food Is Ready, 2019
Sterling silver, copper, wifi car, found objects, acrylic paint, acrylic sheet.
15 x 5 x 7 cm
Photo by: Xiangyin Shi
From series: Digital Communication Jewelry

Detail view.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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