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48 weeks...later

Exhibition  /  15 Sep 2008  -  15 Oct 2008
Published: 03.10.2008
Birmingham City University, Institute of Art and D
Management:
Dr. Jivan Astfalck
Yu-Chi Chang. Piece: Bangle, 2008. Mixed media. My initial inspiration came from the growth pattern of moss – moss plants always grow together, always as a group, and in a humid environment. They interact with each other and are closely linked. Nature is fantastic and full of unique forms, which have their own patterns, structures and qualities. 
. 
. In my childhood I used to go walking on the mountains with my parents, the forest made an impression on me, the trees were huge and some of them were being invaded by other plants. Some dead trees were abandoned, but different plants were still living in them, they managed to survive even though they lived in very poor conditions. 
. 
. The materials I use are wood, silver and resin. Wood is the main material of my work, and I use hand-saw and chisels to show the different grains and textures in the three-dimensional form. The purpose of inlaying silver into wood is to express symbiosis, it can relate to human life or to the water that nourishes moss and wood. I decide which colours to use by “Wu Xing”, the representation of the five elements in Chinese culture – in my work I aim to combine oriental cultural ideas with western design aesthetics.. Yu-Chi Chang
Piece: Bangle, 2008
Mixed media
My initial inspiration came from the growth pattern of moss – moss plants always grow together, always as a group, and in a humid environment. They interact with each other and are closely linked. Nature is fantastic and full of unique forms, which have their own patterns, structures and qualities.

In my childhood I used to go walking on the mountains with my parents, the forest made an impression on me, the trees were huge and some of them were being invaded by other plants. Some dead trees were abandoned, but different plants were still living in them, they managed to survive even though they lived in very poor conditions.

The materials I use are wood, silver and resin. Wood is the main material of my work, and I use hand-saw and chisels to show the different grains and textures in the three-dimensional form. The purpose of inlaying silver into wood is to express symbiosis, it can relate to human life or to the water that nourishes moss and wood. I decide which colours to use by “Wu Xing”, the representation of the five elements in Chinese culture – in my work I aim to combine oriental cultural ideas with western design aesthetics.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
(...) MA Jewellery, Silversmithing & Related Products is the overall title of the course... The variety of materials, manufacturing techniques and processes available to an artist or designer in this field is far larger and of much greater potential than is indicated by the term ‘jewellery and silversmithing’ (...)
MA Jewellery, Silversmithing & Related Products
is the overall title of the course. This is however a very limited and traditional description when one considers the wide variety of products that are within the province of the designer who has knowledge and expertise in the area of personal ornaments, body signification and decorative metal objects. The variety of materials, manufacturing techniques and processes available to an artist or designer in this field is far larger and of much greater potential than is indicated by the term ‘jewellery and silversmithing’ and has some affinities with industrial design, fashion design, fine art and sculpture and is often informed by intellectual engagements like general philosophy, conceptualisation or critical theory.

Our course philosophy addresses the existing and potential relationships within this sector, and educates its students to recognize, identify, understand and operate within this diversity. The philosophy of the course is embodied within a structured project programme that requires students to address vocational and academic research in design by applying their developing abilities and interests to a wide range of issues. Design experiences include ideas generation focused through strategies for concept development, the analysis of design problems and reflection on the relationships between personal objectives, cultural values, market identities, prototyping techniques and new technologies, thus enhancing knowledge and understanding, as well as facilitating the formation of professional studio methodologies.
Christiana Jöckel. Piece: Untitled, 2008m. Mixed media. My perception of freedom of space within architecture and sculpture and my background of Goldsmithing has inspired my interest in spatial objects. 
. 
. I like to explore space by walking and travelling, by making my way through small alleys and pathways. Similarly I like to discover objects visually when handling them. 
. 
. In both cases motion is part of discovering.
. 
. When I am walking, my surroundings change as I move, but when I am working at my bench I like to send my mind on a journey; following uneven surfaces with changing directions that lead the eye around my objects. Light is sometimes shining through the surface. The eyes are invited to wander through the interior and into a labyrinth of undiscovered passageways.
. 
. Visualizing descriptions of architecture and transferring these ideas into another medium helps me to verbalize and translate abstract terms of space. I like to develop pure, simple spatial objects which gain their excitement from the interest of the viewer in exploring their different perspectives.. Christiana Jöckel
Piece: Untitled, 2008m
Mixed media
My perception of freedom of space within architecture and sculpture and my background of Goldsmithing has inspired my interest in spatial objects.

I like to explore space by walking and travelling, by making my way through small alleys and pathways. Similarly I like to discover objects visually when handling them.

In both cases motion is part of discovering.

When I am walking, my surroundings change as I move, but when I am working at my bench I like to send my mind on a journey; following uneven surfaces with changing directions that lead the eye around my objects. Light is sometimes shining through the surface. The eyes are invited to wander through the interior and into a labyrinth of undiscovered passageways.

Visualizing descriptions of architecture and transferring these ideas into another medium helps me to verbalize and translate abstract terms of space. I like to develop pure, simple spatial objects which gain their excitement from the interest of the viewer in exploring their different perspectives.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Holly Hendry. Necklace: Rubber floc king pearls, 2008. Mixed media. The inspiration and concept for my current collection of jewellery began with my fascination with rubber and the way I observed how people react to it. The material provokes its vast range of associations, from feelings of reassurance, amusement and intrigue, to discomfort, embarrassment, stimulation, and disgust.
. 
. My work consists of a range of neckpieces, brooches and rings made from silicone rubber in fluorescent reds, neutral flesh tones and muted greys. The forms I create are highly flexible, soft and tactile. I take inspiration from fun forms of toys and balloons to create shapes which are ambiguous and quirky, while being at the same time sophisticated and sculptural.  
. 
. I like to explore the playfulness of touch and colour together with the way in which a piece connects with the wearer or viewer. Throughout the collection I aimed to create works in which the wearer or viewer may find cheeky hints of the sexual, while at the same time being attracted to the playful and enjoyable qualities of the material.. Holly Hendry
Necklace: Rubber floc king pearls, 2008
Mixed media
The inspiration and concept for my current collection of jewellery began with my fascination with rubber and the way I observed how people react to it. The material provokes its vast range of associations, from feelings of reassurance, amusement and intrigue, to discomfort, embarrassment, stimulation, and disgust.

My work consists of a range of neckpieces, brooches and rings made from silicone rubber in fluorescent reds, neutral flesh tones and muted greys. The forms I create are highly flexible, soft and tactile. I take inspiration from fun forms of toys and balloons to create shapes which are ambiguous and quirky, while being at the same time sophisticated and sculptural. 

I like to explore the playfulness of touch and colour together with the way in which a piece connects with the wearer or viewer. Throughout the collection I aimed to create works in which the wearer or viewer may find cheeky hints of the sexual, while at the same time being attracted to the playful and enjoyable qualities of the material.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jonathan Olliffe. Piece: In and up, 2008. Mixed media. My current collection explores the notions of ‘tension’ and ‘loss of tension’ within industrial and architectural structures that surround us in our everyday lives. I am influenced by architectural stadium structures, as much as by the complexities of internal spaces within the human body. 
. 
. I aim to challenge the concept of function in contemporary silver, questioning where the boundaries might lay between contemporary silverware and sculpture. 
. 
. Each of my pieces is a study into the formation of ‘tension’ with a strong emphasis on raising techniques that are being used in contemporary fine metalwork. This includes the traditional technique of anticlastic raising, forcing the metal in opposite directions. Other techniques include exposing the structure of the vessel, allowing the solder joints to be seen, and to emphasise the constructed forms by using industrial source material. Each object incorporates a range of non-precious and precious metals. I use fibreglass and a range of colour finishes contrasting and complimenting the precious quality of silver.. Jonathan Olliffe
Piece: In and up, 2008
Mixed media
My current collection explores the notions of ‘tension’ and ‘loss of tension’ within industrial and architectural structures that surround us in our everyday lives. I am influenced by architectural stadium structures, as much as by the complexities of internal spaces within the human body.

I aim to challenge the concept of function in contemporary silver, questioning where the boundaries might lay between contemporary silverware and sculpture.

Each of my pieces is a study into the formation of ‘tension’ with a strong emphasis on raising techniques that are being used in contemporary fine metalwork. This includes the traditional technique of anticlastic raising, forcing the metal in opposite directions. Other techniques include exposing the structure of the vessel, allowing the solder joints to be seen, and to emphasise the constructed forms by using industrial source material. Each object incorporates a range of non-precious and precious metals. I use fibreglass and a range of colour finishes contrasting and complimenting the precious quality of silver.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Karen Bartlett. Brooch: Untitled, 2008. Mixed media. My enquiry is concerned with how the dynamics and perceptions of materials alter when used in an unfamiliar context, or if used as a visual metaphor for an underlying thought or theme.
. 
. It is the inherent quality that certain materials possess which attracts my attention on both an aesthetic and sensory level. It results in the subsequent utilisation of a divergent range of materials that are evident within the realisation of my work.
. 
. There are many factors which shape and inform the value system that society places on materials which are, for example, governed by historical, cultural or commercial concerns. Whilst influenced by these concerns, as individuals our perceived ideal of what constitutes preciousness is a subjective matter. In some instances, when creating wearable objects I play with this notion through the use and juxtaposition of ‘precious’ and ‘non precious’ material in an attempt to create and generate a new language and discourse.
. 
. Other works take their cue from the human body and mimic bodily parts such as skin and hair, which hold a great fascination on many levels. These objects are ambiguous by nature and imbued with sexual or erotic overtones. They exist as wearable extensions of the body and invite provocative question and comment.. Karen Bartlett
Brooch: Untitled, 2008
Mixed media
My enquiry is concerned with how the dynamics and perceptions of materials alter when used in an unfamiliar context, or if used as a visual metaphor for an underlying thought or theme.

It is the inherent quality that certain materials possess which attracts my attention on both an aesthetic and sensory level. It results in the subsequent utilisation of a divergent range of materials that are evident within the realisation of my work.

There are many factors which shape and inform the value system that society places on materials which are, for example, governed by historical, cultural or commercial concerns. Whilst influenced by these concerns, as individuals our perceived ideal of what constitutes preciousness is a subjective matter. In some instances, when creating wearable objects I play with this notion through the use and juxtaposition of ‘precious’ and ‘non precious’ material in an attempt to create and generate a new language and discourse.

Other works take their cue from the human body and mimic bodily parts such as skin and hair, which hold a great fascination on many levels. These objects are ambiguous by nature and imbued with sexual or erotic overtones. They exist as wearable extensions of the body and invite provocative question and comment.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Kathryn Vosper. Piece: Untitled, 2008. Mixed media. During a visit to Devon, where I was born and brought up I realised how important my background was and how inspirational I found the environment. 
. 
. I wished to create an installation piece that explored the visual aesthetic of the coast line where I grew up and to communicate its atmosphere and drama in an unsentimental way. 
. 
. The use of felt enabled me to encase pebbles that I had collected from the area with a natural material to protect the precious object inside and my memory of the place where it was found like a postcard. 
. 
. I hope the tactile individuality of each piece encourages the viewer to handle the work to discover the weight of the pebble and the softness of the felt package when held in the palm of the hand. I would like the installation to encourage the audience to recreate the way people carefully search and select pebbles on the beach to add to their collection.. Kathryn Vosper
Piece: Untitled, 2008
Mixed media
During a visit to Devon, where I was born and brought up I realised how important my background was and how inspirational I found the environment.

I wished to create an installation piece that explored the visual aesthetic of the coast line where I grew up and to communicate its atmosphere and drama in an unsentimental way.

The use of felt enabled me to encase pebbles that I had collected from the area with a natural material to protect the precious object inside and my memory of the place where it was found like a postcard.

I hope the tactile individuality of each piece encourages the viewer to handle the work to discover the weight of the pebble and the softness of the felt package when held in the palm of the hand. I would like the installation to encourage the audience to recreate the way people carefully search and select pebbles on the beach to add to their collection.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sally Collins. Brooch: Giant brooch, 2008. Mixed media. The main focus of my work lies in the exploration of the evolution of form and ornamentation. In my most recent body of work ‘Make Do and Mend’ I have created a range of jewels from second-hand fabric, crochet, lace, heat treated copper and gold- plated elements. I aim to explore a traditionally domestic approach to recycling and sustainability, whilst following the progression of form and decoration through an evolution of scale, density and eccentricity. I create wearable compositions through the layering of pattern, colour and form with an emphasis on excess detailing and frills, taking pleasure in unusual or abundant combinations of fabrics and textures.. Sally Collins
Brooch: Giant brooch, 2008
Mixed media
The main focus of my work lies in the exploration of the evolution of form and ornamentation. In my most recent body of work ‘Make Do and Mend’ I have created a range of jewels from second-hand fabric, crochet, lace, heat treated copper and gold- plated elements. I aim to explore a traditionally domestic approach to recycling and sustainability, whilst following the progression of form and decoration through an evolution of scale, density and eccentricity. I create wearable compositions through the layering of pattern, colour and form with an emphasis on excess detailing and frills, taking pleasure in unusual or abundant combinations of fabrics and textures.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Susanne Holzinger. Bracelet: Paper bevelled slate, 2008. Mixed media. I have always loved to work with paper. Paper is the most ordinary and multifunctional material of our times and I asked myself: can paper be jewellery?
. 
. Jewellery for me is sculptural art within the limits of wearability, volume and stability. By creating solid wood-like blocks of layered paper I designed a material that is suitable to fulfil these criteria. I want to stimulate the sense of touch as well as the eye. You can only suggest an aesthetic pleasure with the eye, but touch offers physical experience of the tactility of the pieces. Their surface is warm, dry and smooth and the organic shapes have a tactile sensual quality. When carving these paper blocks I draw the layered lines of coloured grain into organic forms. With every cut I control the lines in a desired direction. I refer to carving these paper blocks as drawing with the knife. During the carving process I feel the form with my fingertips and developed my sensitivity for the form in dialogue with exploring the material, which allows me to intuitively expose its essential qualities. My design process is based on my tactile sense of aesthetics and my physical perceptions. In this way, every piece is unique and can not ever be exactly duplicated.. Susanne Holzinger
Bracelet: Paper bevelled slate, 2008
Mixed media
I have always loved to work with paper. Paper is the most ordinary and multifunctional material of our times and I asked myself: can paper be jewellery?

Jewellery for me is sculptural art within the limits of wearability, volume and stability. By creating solid wood-like blocks of layered paper I designed a material that is suitable to fulfil these criteria. I want to stimulate the sense of touch as well as the eye. You can only suggest an aesthetic pleasure with the eye, but touch offers physical experience of the tactility of the pieces. Their surface is warm, dry and smooth and the organic shapes have a tactile sensual quality. When carving these paper blocks I draw the layered lines of coloured grain into organic forms. With every cut I control the lines in a desired direction. I refer to carving these paper blocks as drawing with the knife. During the carving process I feel the form with my fingertips and developed my sensitivity for the form in dialogue with exploring the material, which allows me to intuitively expose its essential qualities. My design process is based on my tactile sense of aesthetics and my physical perceptions. In this way, every piece is unique and can not ever be exactly duplicated.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Thayuta Trichaiyaporn. Piece: Untitled, 2008. Mixed media. I believe that people live and learn from experiences and move forward to their dreams and wishes. From my experience, my ‘time machine’ often takes me back to the amazing diary in my brain which is full of thoughts, dreams, reason and emotions, some good to keep and some hard to forget. Something deeply personal in me can recall a story which has occurred in the past and once happened this memory can last for a lifetime - I use this as my inspiration.
. 
. Human memory can broadly be defined as a function of the brain that gives us our ability to store and retrieve information. First there is memory that is full of imagination and from which daydreams are created, where the mind is drifting and is making up stories from past stories. The second is a complicated aspect, it is confusing and full of questions when I try to discover reasons, answers or conclusions. The third has all the information I have learnt since I was born, this is about my learning experience. 
. 
. I created jewellery pieces that explore these definitions by using combinations of colorful Acrylic and different types of metal, connecting each element together to tell a story.. Thayuta Trichaiyaporn
Piece: Untitled, 2008
Mixed media
I believe that people live and learn from experiences and move forward to their dreams and wishes. From my experience, my ‘time machine’ often takes me back to the amazing diary in my brain which is full of thoughts, dreams, reason and emotions, some good to keep and some hard to forget. Something deeply personal in me can recall a story which has occurred in the past and once happened this memory can last for a lifetime - I use this as my inspiration.

Human memory can broadly be defined as a function of the brain that gives us our ability to store and retrieve information. First there is memory that is full of imagination and from which daydreams are created, where the mind is drifting and is making up stories from past stories. The second is a complicated aspect, it is confusing and full of questions when I try to discover reasons, answers or conclusions. The third has all the information I have learnt since I was born, this is about my learning experience.

I created jewellery pieces that explore these definitions by using combinations of colorful Acrylic and different types of metal, connecting each element together to tell a story.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Tianfei Gao. Piece: Untitled, 2008. Mixed media. Modern city life is high-speed - a vast number of things happen at the same time everyday. There are too many things we demand, and too many things we are afraid to loose. In our limited lifetime, we spend too much time focusing on chasing and holding. This super-speedy life makes us exhausted. When we are tired we loose focus on important details. Day after day of busy life makes us loose our sensibility to empathise with others. We are lacking communication and neglect that which is truly valuable. 
. 
. What I try to do in my work is to allow people to slow down or to even stop altogether for a while - re-assessing life in detail and re-considering the meaning of living. Although my pieces are just simple cubic shapes, but being inside and paying more attention to detail, you will find something new and different.
. 
. The work is a medium to link the wearer, viewer and the environment.
. 
. I translate painting into three-dimensional and wearable objects. The square is a shaped frame-structure that is designed to be worn on the shoulders. Abstracted cityscapes are painted on transparent silk to represent different moods of city-life.. Tianfei Gao
Piece: Untitled, 2008
Mixed media
Modern city life is high-speed - a vast number of things happen at the same time everyday. There are too many things we demand, and too many things we are afraid to loose. In our limited lifetime, we spend too much time focusing on chasing and holding. This super-speedy life makes us exhausted. When we are tired we loose focus on important details. Day after day of busy life makes us loose our sensibility to empathise with others. We are lacking communication and neglect that which is truly valuable.

What I try to do in my work is to allow people to slow down or to even stop altogether for a while - re-assessing life in detail and re-considering the meaning of living. Although my pieces are just simple cubic shapes, but being inside and paying more attention to detail, you will find something new and different.

The work is a medium to link the wearer, viewer and the environment.

I translate painting into three-dimensional and wearable objects. The square is a shaped frame-structure that is designed to be worn on the shoulders. Abstracted cityscapes are painted on transparent silk to represent different moods of city-life.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Tusheeta David. Piece: Untitled, 2008. Mixed media. In contrast to traditional precious metal, the unglamorous ubiquity of plastics and its availability in a wide range of colours led me to explore its properties further. Colour is very crucial to my design aesthetics, and I combine hand-dyed bright colours with fluorescent acrylic. My work explores the play of light in the material, thus exploiting its properties of edge-lighting and transparency. 
. I am inspired by the mystery that highly microscopic images convey - a sense of wonder of a parallel life veiled beneath perceived existence. I use these images from nature to create highly magnified digital patterns using CAD. Thermoforming techniques assist me in creating simple yet sensuous forms in acrylic which act as the canvas for these elaborate patterns.  In my designs I use existing laser technology in a new context. The result is an exciting symbiosis of colour, form, material and technology. 
. 
. My jewellery expresses explorations of sculptural form, colour and pattern with a visually stunning theatricality of scale and flamboyance.. Tusheeta David
Piece: Untitled, 2008
Mixed media
In contrast to traditional precious metal, the unglamorous ubiquity of plastics and its availability in a wide range of colours led me to explore its properties further. Colour is very crucial to my design aesthetics, and I combine hand-dyed bright colours with fluorescent acrylic. My work explores the play of light in the material, thus exploiting its properties of edge-lighting and transparency.
I am inspired by the mystery that highly microscopic images convey - a sense of wonder of a parallel life veiled beneath perceived existence. I use these images from nature to create highly magnified digital patterns using CAD. Thermoforming techniques assist me in creating simple yet sensuous forms in acrylic which act as the canvas for these elaborate patterns.  In my designs I use existing laser technology in a new context. The result is an exciting symbiosis of colour, form, material and technology.

My jewellery expresses explorations of sculptural form, colour and pattern with a visually stunning theatricality of scale and flamboyance.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Diana Silva. Piece: Second skin, 2008. Mixed media. As far as I am concerned life is made of good and bad memories, and every one is in our brain for ever and ever. Sometimes the brain blocks the bad memories, which helps; but this does not always happen. To help my brain I made eight pieces of jewellery, like a therapy. I use latex (second skin) to package old little objects, words or images.   
. The human body is so delicate, so sensitive and not just psychologically but physically too.  I have the idea of protecting myself.  I constructed a shirt, my second skin, made in baby-pink very thin latex sheet. I covered the skin with little latex scales, a second skin similar to the skin of snakes. I added very long sleeves, like the image of old skin, not quite falling off like the skin of serpents. Protection is not really simple or innocent, it also functions as seduction. Seduction and temptation are connotations that remind us of old and powerful legends, histories and enchanted tales of serpents and dragons.. Diana Silva
Piece: Second skin, 2008
Mixed media
As far as I am concerned life is made of good and bad memories, and every one is in our brain for ever and ever. Sometimes the brain blocks the bad memories, which helps; but this does not always happen. To help my brain I made eight pieces of jewellery, like a therapy. I use latex (second skin) to package old little objects, words or images.  
The human body is so delicate, so sensitive and not just psychologically but physically too.  I have the idea of protecting myself.  I constructed a shirt, my second skin, made in baby-pink very thin latex sheet. I covered the skin with little latex scales, a second skin similar to the skin of snakes. I added very long sleeves, like the image of old skin, not quite falling off like the skin of serpents. Protection is not really simple or innocent, it also functions as seduction. Seduction and temptation are connotations that remind us of old and powerful legends, histories and enchanted tales of serpents and dragons.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Hana Lin. Ring: Jelly park, 2008. Mixed media. I have brought some elements of my paintings into the themes of my jewellery. All my paintings have their own stories, consequently all my jewellery pieces have their own stories too. The wearer of my jewellery can get more than just a single piece of accessory - they can also wear a dream and a mysterious part of my world.
. 
. My work could be described as ‘whimsical’, but there is always a dark, sinister undertone as well. I like to create objects which have a disturbing or odd meaning behind them, but visually look just lovely and even innocent. I create my quirky and sometimes surreal view of the world. For example, I would imagine that the top of the body and the bottom of the body would want to go different ways, so they have decided to disconnect and go separate ways.
. 
. I like to use ready-made objects as materials or images in my work, such as candy boxes, bar-codes or small toys, things that represent everyday life and society today. These materials and colours are normally associated with childhood or even childishness; it might remind people of happy, pure, sweet feelings. In contrast, the shapes or meanings of my pieces have very dark feelings indeed
. 
. I hope my jewellery allows people to share my inner world, my passion for art and the possibility to see the world with different eyes.. Hana Lin
Ring: Jelly park, 2008
Mixed media
I have brought some elements of my paintings into the themes of my jewellery. All my paintings have their own stories, consequently all my jewellery pieces have their own stories too. The wearer of my jewellery can get more than just a single piece of accessory - they can also wear a dream and a mysterious part of my world.

My work could be described as ‘whimsical’, but there is always a dark, sinister undertone as well. I like to create objects which have a disturbing or odd meaning behind them, but visually look just lovely and even innocent. I create my quirky and sometimes surreal view of the world. For example, I would imagine that the top of the body and the bottom of the body would want to go different ways, so they have decided to disconnect and go separate ways.

I like to use ready-made objects as materials or images in my work, such as candy boxes, bar-codes or small toys, things that represent everyday life and society today. These materials and colours are normally associated with childhood or even childishness; it might remind people of happy, pure, sweet feelings. In contrast, the shapes or meanings of my pieces have very dark feelings indeed

I hope my jewellery allows people to share my inner world, my passion for art and the possibility to see the world with different eyes.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Lucy Harvey. Pin: Divination pins, 2008. Mixed media. I am fascinated with our relationship with objects - how we reflect ourselves in them for reassurance and protection, escapism and discovery. 
. 
. Assuming the role of a fraudulent anthropologist, I combine small-scale metal work with found objects to create enigmatic artefacts, which toy with our desire to believe in the fantastic. Juxtaposing fact and fiction and enclosing my work in perplexing environments encourages belief and invites the viewer’s imagination to wander. Using the authority of museum and reliquary, I present evidence that speaks of the uncanny, the absent, and the melancholy.. Lucy Harvey
Pin: Divination pins, 2008
Mixed media
I am fascinated with our relationship with objects - how we reflect ourselves in them for reassurance and protection, escapism and discovery.

Assuming the role of a fraudulent anthropologist, I combine small-scale metal work with found objects to create enigmatic artefacts, which toy with our desire to believe in the fantastic. Juxtaposing fact and fiction and enclosing my work in perplexing environments encourages belief and invites the viewer’s imagination to wander. Using the authority of museum and reliquary, I present evidence that speaks of the uncanny, the absent, and the melancholy.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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