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Blurring Boundaries by Svenja John and Jochen Holz

Exhibition  /  18 Jun 2022  -  24 Sep 2022
Published: 03.05.2022
Blurring Boundaries by Svenja John and Jochen Holz.
Schmagold
Management:
Franziska Appel
Svenja John. Brooch: Petuschki, 2021. Polycarbonate Makrolon, nylon 3D-printed, fine-pigmented acrylic paint.. 8 x 8 x 3 cm. Photo by: Svenja John. Svenja John
Brooch: Petuschki, 2021
Polycarbonate Makrolon, nylon 3D-printed, fine-pigmented acrylic paint.
8 x 8 x 3 cm
Photo by: Svenja John
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Is it still contemporary to draw a hard line firmly between handicraft, design and art? Have not many artists been using craft for a long time? And are only fine art artists allowed to declare their work as art?
 

Artist list

Jochen Holz, Svenja John
Svenja John and Jochen Holz impressively show with their work that the lines between art, design and arts and crafts blur. Both originally started off in very classic craft professions but then each found their way to grow beyond to create something new – a unique language of form. It’s hard to pin down their works into craft or art as they move dynamically between both of them. Maybe it’s best to leave judgement to the viewer. In any case, both stand for exceptional positions in contemporary applied arts.

Jewelry artist Svenja John uses poly-carbonate, against the classic precious metals of goldsmiths. She’s been fascinated by this material since the 90s and has been creating small three dimensional artwork with new technologies. She connects meticulously hand painted designed elements to new shape modules in a self-developed plug-in system. The value of her work is not mostly defined by the materials as is usually the case for goldsmith craft. It’s more comparable to work  in fine arts as the artistic effort, conception and aesthetic sustainability of the work are in focus. Her works won multiple awards and can be found in museums and galleries.
 
German glass artist Jochen Holz, who works and lives in London, went on to study at the Royal College of Art, following his scientific lampworking apprenticeship. There he distanced himself from the classic craft to develop his own style. He used the lamp-working technique in which borosilicate glass is warmed over a burner. With this technique he manages to breath life into a rather plain material. As well as different coloured glass objects and light installations, Jochen Holz experiments with new textures on transparent glass. His works are exhibited in international galleries and were shown at exhibitions such as Miami Basel or Salone del Mobile.


Exhibition duration/ Opening hours 18.6. 2022 - 24.9.2022
For the opening of the event on Saturday 18.6.2022 the gallery will be open from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m..

Tue - Fri: 10 am - 6 pm
Sat: 10 am - 3 pm

Press Preview Friday, 17.6.2022 from 4.30 pm
 
Jochen Holz. Vase: Root, 2021. Borosilicate glass.. 10 x 20 cm. Photo by: Jochen Holz. Jochen Holz
Vase: Root, 2021
Borosilicate glass.
10 x 20 cm
Photo by: Jochen Holz
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jochen Holz. Vessel: Untitled, 2021. Borosilicate glass.. 20 x 30 cm. Photo by: Jochen Holz. Jochen Holz
Vessel: Untitled, 2021
Borosilicate glass.
20 x 30 cm
Photo by: Jochen Holz
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jochen Holz. Object: Neons, 2021. Borosilicate glass, gas Helium/ Neon.. 40 x 50 x 55 cm. Photo by: Jochen Holz. Jochen Holz
Object: Neons, 2021
Borosilicate glass, gas Helium/ Neon.
40 x 50 x 55 cm
Photo by: Jochen Holz
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jochen Holz. Vessel: Cactus, 2021. Borosilicate glass.. 25 x 40 cm. Photo by: Jochen Holz. Jochen Holz
Vessel: Cactus, 2021
Borosilicate glass.
25 x 40 cm
Photo by: Jochen Holz
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jochen Holz. Vessel: Toffee, 2021. Borosilicate glass.. 25 x 35 cm. Photo by: Jochen Holz. Jochen Holz
Vessel: Toffee, 2021
Borosilicate glass.
25 x 35 cm
Photo by: Jochen Holz
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Svenja John. Bracelet: Minoo, 2016. Polycarbonate Makrolon, nylon 3D-printed, fine-pigmented acrylic paint.. 11 x 11 x 7.5 cm. Photo by: Ludger Paffrath. Svenja John
Bracelet: Minoo, 2016
Polycarbonate Makrolon, nylon 3D-printed, fine-pigmented acrylic paint.
11 x 11 x 7.5 cm
Photo by: Ludger Paffrath
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Svenja John. Necklace: Oxomo, 2020. Polycarbonate Makrolon, nylon 3D-printed, fine-pigmented acrylic paint.. 21 x 43 x 2.5 cm. Photo by: Ludger Paffrath. Svenja John
Necklace: Oxomo, 2020
Polycarbonate Makrolon, nylon 3D-printed, fine-pigmented acrylic paint.
21 x 43 x 2.5 cm
Photo by: Ludger Paffrath
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Svenja John. Brooch: Maputo, 2021. Polycarbonate Makrolon, nylon 3D-printed, fine-pigmented acrylic paint.. 9 x 17 x 2 cm. Photo by: Ludger Paffrath. Svenja John
Brooch: Maputo, 2021
Polycarbonate Makrolon, nylon 3D-printed, fine-pigmented acrylic paint.
9 x 17 x 2 cm
Photo by: Ludger Paffrath
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Svenja John. Brooch: Halifax, 2021. Polycarbonate Makrolon, nylon 3D-printed, fine-pigmented acrylic paint.. 7.5 x 15 x 6 cm. Photo by: Svenja John. Svenja John
Brooch: Halifax, 2021
Polycarbonate Makrolon, nylon 3D-printed, fine-pigmented acrylic paint.
7.5 x 15 x 6 cm
Photo by: Svenja John
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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