Back

Dust Included

Exhibition  /  25 Sep 2014  -  17 Oct 2014
Published: 24.09.2014
Ubi Gallery
Management:
Machtelt Schelling
.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Ubi Gallery presents in "Dust Included" 13 artists connected to China and Netherlands. The show aims to call the attention of the viewer for a current and worrying problem: the pollution in the megacities as Beijing. With provocative pieces and a subliminal message, "Dust Included" is an exhibition to reflect.

Artist list

Hortense de La Jonquiere, Joke Schole, Liu Xiao, Sun Jingyao, Liang Li, JJ Wun, Po Yu Wang, Ying Hsun Hsu, Han Chieh-Chuang, Huang Luran, Elisabeth Koch, Eva De Laat, Byborre, Eindhoven University Of Technology, Wang Feihang
Amid the events taking place in Dashilar during Beijing Design Week, Ubi Gallery’s minimalist and stylish interior provides a calm sanctuary. This year, the gallery presents DUST INCLUDED, a thought-provoking exhibit of contemporary jewellery, ceramics and lifestyle goods, showcasing the work of 13 artists connected to China and The Netherlands.

DUST INCLUDED explores the theme of dust and pollution in Beijing and other megacities. Visitors are confronted by Joke Schole’s angry bear, who proclaims, ‘Clean up your own mess’. Other artists such as Liang Li treat dust as a byproduct of human failure, incorporating it into her work as an ‘Award for Bad Conduct’. Hortense de La Jonquière’s masterpiece—a cabinet constructed of Beijing dust—shows how dust captures memories, reminders of things past. Prominent milliner Elisabeth Koch adopts “crust” material used in environmental cleanup to create hats intended to deflect dust on a daily basis. The Dutch design collective of Eva de Laat, ByBorre and the University of Eindhoven propose futurist clothing to shield those living in polluted urban environments. Visitors will also find limited edition collector’s items and affordable gifts commissioned for the exhibit, as well as a portion of Ubi Gallery’s permanent collection.

Curator: Machtelt Schelling

Hortense de la Jonquiere (fr/nl)
The idea behind and the execution of Hortense de La Jonquière’s work gradually developed during her studies in France and the Design Academy in Eindhoven. It started with the shovel and the brush. Products made out of rice flour and dust. Rice flour was used like a mortar on the great wall of China. The shovel is the packaging and the dust is the contents. The contents become the packaging. The elegant cabinet is made with Beijing dust. Each drawer contains memories, each drawer represent a part of your life.

Joke Schole (nl)
Joke Schole’s fragile, humorous worlds simultaneously disclose complicated issues. Childhood dreams, imaginary schemes, and stuffed animals contribute to constructions that recall Roald Dahl’s stories. Reanimating cherished found objects, whether old toys or specimens from nature. With her porcelain moulds, Schole transforms each incorporated element. Spontaneous choices, fine details, and medium specific constraints combine to propose unexpected relationships. The wall statues of the angry cleaning up bears is a statement that animals never need to tidy up. The bears look human with there brooms, dustpan and brush, referring to humans making a mess of nature.

Liu Xiao (cn)
The material Liu Xiao uses for his work are dust and grains, both very common and unattractive. He questions the status of material by using them. And at the same time by repetitive and ritual movements he is able to transform this material into something else – which has the appearance of raw crystal stone. The dirty and ephemeral substance changes into something precious and durable. For Liu Xiao this working process is related to the discipline of Zen. By repetitive and ritual movements, by daily practice, you can cultivate yourself as a human being and change into something more precious and durable.

Sun Jingyao (cn)
The graduation work of Sun YingYao has a different angle on dust and soil. She is fascinated by the decomposition of beautiful symbols. Like roses. She depicts the magic circle of growing, returning to ashes and nourishing new life again. It is the breath of life. She uses soil, rose petals, cotton and brass – in warm mysterious colours. The natural texture of this self-made material is soft and intimate. It blends with the body and by the size of it, still is able to communicate a statement.

Liang Li (sweden/cn)
Especially for the BJDW the awarded jewellery designer Liang Li made contemporary medals, constructed with Beijing dust, plaster and mask filters - to ask for attention for those things that are not sustainable and poisoning our environment. As soon as someone feel suitable to put the medal on, the dust will fall out. Even the award itself is not sustainable.

JJ Wun (hk)
Dust has everything to do with the origin of life on earth. Through gravity things will become dust and life and memories will break down and grow into something new. The artist JJ prepared pendants to showcase the magical transformation. She used canvas, dust, soil, wood and horn. Natural materials tracing forgotten pasts and pointing to new futures.

Po Yu Wang (cn)
This young Chinese artist joins the exhibition with an elegant necklace, capturing particles. Visible particles in the air are not merely sandstorm residues as they were in previous times. Nowadays they often are tiny elements from the construction of new cities. How to find a balance between the needed comfort and the care for our environment? Vic doesn’t give an answer but captures the moment to give us something to reflect on.

Ying Hsun Hsu (tw)
This Taiwanese artist shows brooches made out of iron flakes, using magnetic power. For her capturing changes in time, the wear and tear of normal things - the deformation and shrinkage, the historical evidence are essential. The vulnerability of the imperfection is awesome. Hsu records the memories of the invisible, before things crumble into dust.

Han Chieh-Chuang (tw)
Han Chieh-Chuang made a collection called ‘Red Brick’, using enamel, silver, copper, paper, gold dust and brass dust. It is a celebration of the beauty of traditional skills and materials and a way of honoring the farming villages, the foundation of the Taiwanese economy. Tired from the anonymous and busy urban life abroad, the artist felt a strong emotional connection with the opposite; the relation between people and land and the relation with her own tradition. She tries to overcome the risk of a sentimental journey where the beauty of the simple farming life is romanticized. Chuang Han-Chieh is too much of an artist to let this happen. She didn’t give in on the composition, the use of material and technique resulting in two strong, contemporary and independent pieces.

Huang Luran (cn)
According to Huang Luran ceramics is a transformation of dust into something beautiful and useful. It includes dust in a very literal way. Her set of containers and plates are made of purple clay from Yixing. This material is mainly used for the making of the famous teapots. But Huang Luran changes the raw material into some very simple, elegant and contemporary shapes. The blackness of the ‘purple clay’ to her expresses the suffering of our environment. Our impulsive and possessive character towards the environment doesn’t bring only good things. This series of artwork reflects on this.

Elisabeth Koch (usa / nl / cn)
Ubi Gallery asked the famous creative hat designer Elisabeth Koch to work on some unique pieces for Dust Included. She worked with crust material, provided by Wuvio Asia a Dutch-Chinese company active in combating dust. For companies operating in the waste and recycling industry, energy producers, mining and dry bulk Wuvio created a hardened layer to cover the stacks of raw material that produce a lot of dust. Elisabeth shows that this innovative crust material can be used for yet a totally different purposes; her hats being an unexpected proof of that.

Eva De Laat, Byborre, Eindhoven University Of Technology (cn/nl)
With this project Eva de Laat, ByBorre and Eindhoven University of Technology want to show the possibilities of future clothing that can contribute to the wellbeing of people living in polluted urban environments. Wearable technology integrated in garments can help the wearer to perceive the air quality in their direct environment. This localized data can help the whole community in mapping air pollution in the city. Besides sensing, the wearer can have a more active role by activating special fibers in the garment to attract polluted particles from the air. The project will be shown in various outside areas in Beijing and part of it will be presented in Ubi Gallery.

Pendants and pins dust included
With the wall statues of the angry cleaning up bears Joke Schole states that animals never need to tidy up, but humans make a mess of nature.
Especially for Ubi Gallery Joke made miniature shovels and brushes to wear as jewellery to remind yourself and others of cleaning up. A witty symbol for the serious message to not mess up.

Cups dust inlcuded
Dust particles dancing on your items at home, leaving drops and stains. Wang Feihang catches specific marks of dust and ink stains on ceramic cups. The imprints of the brush, of work done, of a drop of ink into water, mixed with dust and sweat and stained and faded over time. Memories of hard work captured forever.

Remarks

Opening party: September 25, 3.30pm-5.30pm
Several artists will be there to introduce their work to you. They are happy to meet you and you are more than welcome to join.

Opening hours: 10am - 7pm
Xiao Liu. Brooch: The rice stone, 2014. Dust, rice, silver. Xiao Liu
Brooch: The rice stone, 2014
Dust, rice, silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Xiao Liu. Brooch: The rice stone, 2014. Dust, rice, silver. Xiao Liu
Brooch: The rice stone, 2014
Dust, rice, silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sun Jingyao. Body Piece: Live analysis, 2014. Brass, rose, cotton. Sun Jingyao
Body Piece: Live analysis, 2014
Brass, rose, cotton
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sun Jingyao. Body Piece: Live analysis, 2014. Brass, rose, cotton. Sun Jingyao
Body Piece: Live analysis, 2014
Brass, rose, cotton
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Liang Li. Medal: Medal of Merit, 2014. Plaster, Beijing Dust. Liang Li
Medal: Medal of Merit, 2014
Plaster, Beijing Dust
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Liang Li. Medal: Medal of Merit, 2014. Plaster, Beijing Dust. Liang Li
Medal: Medal of Merit, 2014
Plaster, Beijing Dust
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
JJ Wun. Pendant: Magical Forming, 2014. Canvas laminate, crystal, wood, cow horn sheet, waxed cord, acrylic resin, varnish, bamboo, dust. JJ Wun
Pendant: Magical Forming, 2014
Canvas laminate, crystal, wood, cow horn sheet, waxed cord, acrylic resin, varnish, bamboo, dust
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
JJ Wun. Pendant: Magical Forming, 2014. Canvas laminate, crystal, wood, cow horn sheet, waxed cord, acrylic resin, varnish, bamboo, dust. JJ Wun
Pendant: Magical Forming, 2014
Canvas laminate, crystal, wood, cow horn sheet, waxed cord, acrylic resin, varnish, bamboo, dust
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Po Yu Wang. Neckpiece: Guilty, 2014. Brass, poly, silver, copper. Po Yu Wang
Neckpiece: Guilty, 2014
Brass, poly, silver, copper
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ying Hsun Hsu. Brooch: In Flux, 2014. Magnetized iron flakes, resin, black gold plated, white gold plated. Ying Hsun Hsu
Brooch: In Flux, 2014
Magnetized iron flakes, resin, black gold plated, white gold plated
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ying Hsun Hsu. Brooch: In Flux, 2014. Magnetized iron flakes, resin, black gold plated, white gold plated. Ying Hsun Hsu
Brooch: In Flux, 2014
Magnetized iron flakes, resin, black gold plated, white gold plated
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Han Chieh-Chuang. Brooch: Red Brick, 2014. Enamel, copper, paper, silver, steel wire, copper dust, 18k gold dust. Han Chieh-Chuang
Brooch: Red Brick, 2014
Enamel, copper, paper, silver, steel wire, copper dust, 18k gold dust
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Han Chieh-Chuang. Brooch: Red Brick, 2014. Enamel, copper, paper, silver, steel wire, copper dust, 18k gold dust. Han Chieh-Chuang
Brooch: Red Brick, 2014
Enamel, copper, paper, silver, steel wire, copper dust, 18k gold dust
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Huang Luran. Piece: Untitled, 2014. Yixing ceramics. Huang Luran
Piece: Untitled, 2014
Yixing ceramics
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Joke Schole. Sculpture: Untitled, 2014. Fine porcelain, 24k gold. Joke Schole
Sculpture: Untitled, 2014
Fine porcelain, 24k gold
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Hortense de La Jonquiere. Piece: Dust Cabinet, 2014. Copper, plaster, Beijing dust. Hortense de La Jonquiere
Piece: Dust Cabinet, 2014
Copper, plaster, Beijing dust
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Elisabeth Koch. Head Piece: Crust Hat, 2014. Paper pulp,crust. Elisabeth Koch
Head Piece: Crust Hat, 2014
Paper pulp,crust
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Appreciate APPRECIATE