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Fruits of My Labor by Jillian Moore

Exhibition  /  21 Mar 2014  -  03 May 2014
Published: 05.03.2014
Beyond Fashion
Jillian Moore. Piece: Popel, 2009. Foam, composite and epoxy resin, paint, nickel silver. Jillian Moore
Piece: Popel, 2009
Foam, composite and epoxy resin, paint, nickel silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
For Jillian Moore's first solo show in Belgium, "The Fruits of My Labor", an assortment of both major works and smaller, ready-to-wear pieces are presented.

Artist list

Jillian Moore
"For Jillian Moore's first solo show in Belgium, "The Fruits of My Labor", an assortment of both major works and smaller, ready-to-wear pieces are presented. Regardless of scale, Moore's work references biological forms of ambiguous origin. As a result, they straddle both the botanical and zoological. The bright colors paired with the thick gloss of her resin technique creates wearable pieces that are always luscious, and often a little vulgar in one way or another. Moore says of her work:

 "Our natural tendency to seek out patterns results in a sensitivity to the congruities in biological forms. Deliberate exploitation of these phenomena results in objects that are both ambiguous and evocative. Some are organs removed from the body in which they once belonged, revealing structures with unknown functions. Others are complete specimens tagged with labels. Signs of dissection as well as taxonomy provide evidence of attempts to demystify these new organisms. However, this approach leaves many unanswered questions and highlights the inherent ethical compromise in these methods of understanding.

I choose materials and techniques that are transformative, resulting in objects that do not readily reveal the processes of their making. Copper may be hidden under layers of paint, the only exposed metal oxidized. The electroforming process allows for wax forms to be coated in copper leaving a hollow shell with textural encrustations--evidence of the acretivce nature of the process of building copper on a molecular level. The resin pieces are light in weight, built on a core of carved foam that is strengthened by successive layers of an opaque, water-based composite resin. The clear epoxy resin is then layered with paint to create a depth of surface typically expected of glass work. The slick gloss of the resin further mimics biology."
Jillian Moore. Piece: Corallium, 2010. Foam, composite and epoxy resin, paint, nickel silver. Jillian Moore
Piece: Corallium, 2010
Foam, composite and epoxy resin, paint, nickel silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jillian Moore. Piece: Ramifer, 2012. Foam, composite and epoxy resin, paint, nickel silver. Jillian Moore
Piece: Ramifer, 2012
Foam, composite and epoxy resin, paint, nickel silver
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jillian Moore. Piece: Porosus, 2011. Foam, composite and epoxy resin, polymer clay, paint, rubber. Jillian Moore
Piece: Porosus, 2011
Foam, composite and epoxy resin, polymer clay, paint, rubber
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jillian Moore. Piece: Par Lobbe, 2009. Foam, composite and epoxy resin, fabricated copper, paint, weighted and dyed cord. Jillian Moore
Piece: Par Lobbe, 2009
Foam, composite and epoxy resin, fabricated copper, paint, weighted and dyed cord
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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