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Goldschmitte 2018 skyscraper.
LAO Workshops 2018 skyscraper.

Glasgow School of Art, Degree Show 2018

Exhibition  /  SchoolsDegreeShow2018  /  02 Jun 2018  -  08 Jun 2018
Published: 31.05.2018
Ailsa Morrant. Medal: A moment to come, A moment too late, A treasured moment on Hope Street, 2018. Bronze, copper, silver, steel, plastic, acrylic paint and latex rubber.. 9 x 4 x 2 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. From series: Sensing every moment: a celebration of the ordinary. 16 pieces in total.
. 
. The series is of medals celebrating everyday moments of my life -
. I like catching and celebrating moments
. fleeting, instinctive, subconscious ones
. everyday connections with ourselves and others
. over before we were even aware
. my work is about what I can do to enable others
. celebrate their moments too
. if they want to.. Ailsa Morrant
Medal: A moment to come, A moment too late, A treasured moment on Hope Street, 2018
Bronze, copper, silver, steel, plastic, acrylic paint and latex rubber.
9 x 4 x 2 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
From series: Sensing every moment: a celebration of the ordinary
16 pieces in total.

The series is of medals celebrating everyday moments of my life -
I like catching and celebrating moments
fleeting, instinctive, subconscious ones
everyday connections with ourselves and others
over before we were even aware
my work is about what I can do to enable others
celebrate their moments too
if they want to.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The annual undergraduate Degree Show featuring work from graduating students across the School of Design, School of Fine Art, Innovation School and the Mackintosh School of Architecture. Also running concurrently is the annual Master of Fine Art (MFA) Degree Show at The Glue Factory.

Artist list

Rowan Berry, Sophie Daw, Shona Dobie, Lyndsay Fairley, Aileen Gray, Iona Hall, Rachel Hardie, Caitlin Hegney, Astrid Jaroslawsky, Kahyung Kim, Debbie King, Paulina Knapik, Ailsa Morrant, Xingwen Shi, Rosie Souter, Katie Watson, Roslin Watson, Hannah Wood, Ellys May Woods, Sandra Zinkute
Degree Show is free and open to the public.

Next venue:
New Designers, Business Design Centre.
London - 25–30 June 2018.


Heads of Department: Anna Gordon & Helen Marriott.
Lecturers: Andrew Lamb, Silvia Weidenbach, Michael Pell & Marianne Anderson.
Technical Staff: Nigel Munro & Shona Guthrie.
Rowan Berry. Object: Circinus, 2018. 18ct fairtrade gold.. 2.4 x 2.4 x 0.1 cm. Photo by: Rowan Berry. My work explores, reinterprets and subverts a visual language that connects to some of our greatest ontological needs, hopes and emotions. Some examples of this symbolism include the repeated use of circles, knots, constellations, spirals, crosses and hands. Inspiration has been drawn from mythologies, stories of the earth, talismanic objects and folk history. The visual aesthetic of the pieces does not suggest a time period. The objects I create are abstract – but their intention is to provide a comfort, hold a promise, wish, feelings of love or prayer, and help the owner better understand and cope with the world.
.  
. I use engraving, low-resolution 3d printing and etching to provide texture. I leave solder and laser weld joins visible and accepts printing flaws and imperfections from the casting process as an important part of the work as it documents the process of making. This is a reference to historical objects and a contemporary interpretation of historical objects such as pots with fingerprints visible imprinted in the clay. These textures connect visually to fingerprints, wrinkles on skin and the woven layers in textiles. The pieces are mainly 3d printed and then cast into precious and non-precious metal. The pieces also have elements created by hand as well as suggestions of handwriting. By this, I mean a sense of instinctive drawing through engraving on some of the pieces – as well as the translation of the imperfect handwritten shapes into 3d prints through CAD modelling. This exploration of contrasting techniques and binaries will be seen elsewhere in polished and rough surfaces, x and o shapes and organic and ordered forms.
.  
. These objects generally stand alone, often having no natural front or back, with some having the ability to be worn or attached to the body. They are the size to fit in the hand to encourage our instinctive draw to hold, feel and keep objects close to our skin and take comfort from this. These objects are ambiguous in how they are to be used or worn – allowing the owner to find a solution that best suits them. I imagine that the pieces could be sewn onto clothing, hidden in a pocket, threaded with a cord and worn around the neck, or held in the hand. They have a sense of being spiritual or talismanic.. Rowan Berry
Object: Circinus, 2018
18ct fairtrade gold.
2.4 x 2.4 x 0.1 cm
Photo by: Rowan Berry
My work explores, reinterprets and subverts a visual language that connects to some of our greatest ontological needs, hopes and emotions. Some examples of this symbolism include the repeated use of circles, knots, constellations, spirals, crosses and hands. Inspiration has been drawn from mythologies, stories of the earth, talismanic objects and folk history. The visual aesthetic of the pieces does not suggest a time period. The objects I create are abstract – but their intention is to provide a comfort, hold a promise, wish, feelings of love or prayer, and help the owner better understand and cope with the world.
 
I use engraving, low-resolution 3d printing and etching to provide texture. I leave solder and laser weld joins visible and accepts printing flaws and imperfections from the casting process as an important part of the work as it documents the process of making. This is a reference to historical objects and a contemporary interpretation of historical objects such as pots with fingerprints visible imprinted in the clay. These textures connect visually to fingerprints, wrinkles on skin and the woven layers in textiles. The pieces are mainly 3d printed and then cast into precious and non-precious metal. The pieces also have elements created by hand as well as suggestions of handwriting. By this, I mean a sense of instinctive drawing through engraving on some of the pieces – as well as the translation of the imperfect handwritten shapes into 3d prints through CAD modelling. This exploration of contrasting techniques and binaries will be seen elsewhere in polished and rough surfaces, x and o shapes and organic and ordered forms.
 
These objects generally stand alone, often having no natural front or back, with some having the ability to be worn or attached to the body. They are the size to fit in the hand to encourage our instinctive draw to hold, feel and keep objects close to our skin and take comfort from this. These objects are ambiguous in how they are to be used or worn – allowing the owner to find a solution that best suits them. I imagine that the pieces could be sewn onto clothing, hidden in a pocket, threaded with a cord and worn around the neck, or held in the hand. They have a sense of being spiritual or talismanic.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Shona Dobie. Brooch: Circle of Circles and Waves of Red, 2018. Aluminium, enamelled, oxidized copper, oxidised silver and steel pin.. 7 x 1.2 x 7 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. I am inspired by my surroundings of the build-up environment and also with natural forms, including everyday patterns and colour. Picking out ubiquitous circular shapes to create my Graduate collection. I have transferred my inspiration into my work by mainly looking at colour plus the patterns I was drawn to. I have explored different techniques to create pattern and repetition into my collection of jewellery.
. 
. I have been exploring the technique of enamelling; which has been a great way to add colour and texture to my collection. I have combined my enamelling work with a non-precious light metal; aluminium which has allowed me to work in a larger scale. I have additionally used a variation of cold connections in my work which has allowed me to make my Graduate collection of jewellery playful and able to interact with the wearer.. Shona Dobie
Brooch: Circle of Circles and Waves of Red, 2018
Aluminium, enamelled, oxidized copper, oxidised silver and steel pin.
7 x 1.2 x 7 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
I am inspired by my surroundings of the build-up environment and also with natural forms, including everyday patterns and colour. Picking out ubiquitous circular shapes to create my Graduate collection. I have transferred my inspiration into my work by mainly looking at colour plus the patterns I was drawn to. I have explored different techniques to create pattern and repetition into my collection of jewellery.

I have been exploring the technique of enamelling; which has been a great way to add colour and texture to my collection. I have combined my enamelling work with a non-precious light metal; aluminium which has allowed me to work 
in a larger scale. I have additionally used a variation of cold connections in my work which has allowed me to make my Graduate collection of jewellery playful and able to interact with the wearer.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Aileen Gray. Brooch: Untitled, 2018. Silver, copper.. 7.5 x 3.5 x 5.5 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. My collection is inspired by the repetition and structural forms in the urban environment with contrasting elements from the light coming from inside the buildings. . Aileen Gray
Brooch: Untitled, 2018
Silver, copper.
7.5 x 3.5 x 5.5 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
My collection is inspired by the repetition and structural forms in the urban environment with contrasting elements from the light coming from inside the buildings. 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Rachel Hardie. Vessel: Wired Vessels, 2018. 9ct gold wire and silver wire.. 5.0 x 4.0 x 5.5 cm, 3.8 x 28.5 x 3 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. My work focuses on the architectural quirks of Glasgow however it is the city’s chimneys where I collect most my inspiration from. Chimneys come in shapes and sizes and sit above the city with no real purpose anymore. However, they were and still are in some cases key to holding a building together and if removed incorrectly the building may collapse. My studio work takes on the variety of shapes and sizes which stem from chimneys with emphasis on the importance of small but essential parts of a piece which people forgot or tend not to consider. I also play and combine different metals together through both wire and sheet building structures which if not carefully treated will collapse.. Rachel Hardie
Vessel: Wired Vessels, 2018
9ct gold wire and silver wire.
5.0 x 4.0 x 5.5 cm, 3.8 x 28.5 x 3 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
My work focuses on the architectural quirks of Glasgow however it is the city’s chimneys where I collect most my inspiration from. Chimneys come in shapes and sizes and sit above the city with no real purpose anymore. However, they were and still are in some cases key to holding a building together and if removed incorrectly the building may collapse. My studio work takes on the variety of shapes and sizes which stem from chimneys with emphasis on the importance of small but essential parts of a piece which people forgot or tend not to consider. I also play and combine different metals together through both wire and sheet building structures which if not carefully treated will collapse.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Caitlin Hegney. Neckpiece: Blues, 2018. Crushed lapis lazuli, brass, jesmonite.. 25 x 3 x 25 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. My work explores material value underpinned by the research of the rich and contradicting history of the colour blue. This research invites exploration of hierarchies, binaries, relationships and tensions through contrasting material textures, weights and finishes. The work simultaneously references but also subverts ancient aesthetics and processes, employing techniques that carry rhythms throughout a varied material palette.. Caitlin Hegney
Neckpiece: Blues, 2018
Crushed lapis lazuli, brass, jesmonite.
25 x 3 x 25 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
My work explores material value underpinned by the research of the rich and contradicting history of the colour blue. This research invites exploration of hierarchies, binaries, relationships and tensions through contrasting material textures, weights and finishes. The work simultaneously references but also subverts ancient aesthetics and processes, employing techniques that carry rhythms throughout a varied material palette.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Astrid Jaroslawsky. Brooch: Untitled, 2018. Sandstone, jesmonite, 925 silver, smoky quarz, 14ct yellow gold.. 7 x 4 x 3.5 cm. Photo by: Andrew McCue. A body of work inspired by Glasgow aimed to explore items of jewellery as mnemonic pieces which can remember places and experiences. With the focus on the material´s sentimental value rather it´s intrinsic worth alongside the symbolic value of empty space.. Astrid Jaroslawsky
Brooch: Untitled, 2018
Sandstone, jesmonite, 925 silver, smoky quarz, 14ct yellow gold.
7 x 4 x 3.5 cm
Photo by: Andrew McCue
A body of work inspired by Glasgow aimed to explore items of jewellery as mnemonic pieces which can remember places and experiences. With the focus on the material´s sentimental value rather it´s intrinsic worth alongside the symbolic value of empty space.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Paulina Knapik. Brooch: Untitled, 2018. 925 silver, 9ct yellow gold, steel, ruby.. 9 x 5 x 4 cm. Photo by: Natalia Poniatowska. A body of work inspired by the Art Nouveau and its aesthetics along with the influence of the Japanese Art, here represented by origami. Main focus was directed at ‘Precious Stones’, a series of paintings by Alphonse Mucha, focusing at the certain aspects, such as harmony of the geometry and nature, delicacy, repetitions, decorativeness and a high volume of intricate details.. Paulina Knapik
Brooch: Untitled, 2018
925 silver, 9ct yellow gold, steel, ruby.
9 x 5 x 4 cm
Photo by: Natalia Poniatowska
A body of work inspired by the Art Nouveau and its aesthetics along with the influence of the Japanese Art, here represented by origami. Main focus was directed at ‘Precious Stones’, a series of paintings by Alphonse Mucha, focusing at the certain aspects, such as harmony of the geometry and nature, delicacy, repetitions, decorativeness and a high volume of intricate details.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Katie Watson. Set: The Wonders of Nature, 2018. Silver, copper.. 8 x 12 cm, 8 x 9 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. Leaf Cups Set of Two Cups
. 
. My collection is depicting nature’s beauty, and the magnificence that is all around us. My making process starts with a walk, whether it be along the coast or overcoming obstacles in the woods, focussing particularly on my hometown of North Berwick. I collect anything I find of interest, from fallen leaves, pine cones, or an unusual fragment of shell, as well as photographs. Using these as inspiration, I look at the patterns, lines and textures I have found and translate them into metal using ‘chasing and repousse’. This technique lends itself beautifully to reimagining these forms in my silversmithing, as it allows me to create many varied organic lines and forms, thus bringing the outdoors in. . Katie Watson
Set: The Wonders of Nature, 2018
Silver, copper.
8 x 12 cm, 8 x 9 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
Leaf Cups Set of Two Cups

My collection is depicting nature’s beauty, and the magnificence that is all around us. My making process starts with a walk, whether it be along the coast or overcoming obstacles in the woods, focussing particularly on my hometown of North Berwick. I collect anything I find of interest, from fallen leaves, pine cones, or an unusual fragment of shell, as well as photographs. Using these as inspiration, I look at the patterns, lines and textures I have found and translate them into metal using ‘chasing and 
repousse’. This technique lends itself beautifully to reimagining these forms in my silversmithing, as it allows me to create many varied organic lines and forms, thus bringing the outdoors in.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sandra Zinkute. Brooch: Space Donut, 2018. Plastic, spray paint, varnish, silver, gold leaf, steel pin.. 10 x 4 x 10  cm. Photo by: Natalia Potiatowska. By combining recycled materials and creating one-off pieces which are limited to their material availability I am tackling the materiality of jewellery and challenging what can be perceived as precious. With the plastic waste mainly resourced from the beach and water drainage systems, I am looking and recreating their qualities to show that these oil-based materials can be enduring, emotionally durable and precious. Plastic is the only material that is original to planet Earth, while cosmos is full of gold, diamonds and other “precious” materials. Holding a sentiment for the exploration of outer space in the compulsion to find comfort that we are not alone in the cold universe and fascination over colourful nebulas I am exploring the curiosity of the unknown in humankind. . Sandra Zinkute
Brooch: Space Donut, 2018
Plastic, spray paint, varnish, silver, gold leaf, steel pin.
10 x 4 x 10 cm
Photo by: Natalia Potiatowska
By combining recycled materials and creating one-off pieces which are limited to their material availability I am tackling the materiality of jewellery and challenging what can be perceived as precious. With the plastic waste mainly resourced from the beach and water drainage systems, I am looking and recreating their qualities to show that these oil-based materials can be enduring, emotionally durable and precious. Plastic is the only material that is original to planet Earth, while cosmos is full of gold, diamonds and other “precious” materials. Holding a sentiment for the exploration of outer space in the compulsion to find comfort that we are not alone in the cold universe and fascination over colourful nebulas I am exploring the curiosity of the unknown in humankind. 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sophie Daw. Brooch: Untitled, 2018. Jesmonite. 10 x 2 x 2 cm. Photo by: Sophie Daw. My work is inspired by my personal connection to Glasgow, a city I have lived in for 25 years. Glasgow is a patchwork of textures and colour and for years I have used photography to capture this aesthetic, an attempt to encapsulate my experiences. For my final project I have adopted this approach again, taking photographs that focus primarily on colour, texture and composition. Using jesmonite and plaster as my main components I have applied these three elements to produce a body of work that is tactile, bold and visually appealing. The lightness of the material has allowed them to be created into wearable sculptures, able to move throughout the city, adding to the industrial, colourful and vibrant aesthetics that they were inspired from.  . Sophie Daw
Brooch: Untitled, 2018
Jesmonite
10 x 2 x 2 cm
Photo by: Sophie Daw
My work is inspired by my personal connection to Glasgow, a city I have lived in for 25 years. Glasgow is a patchwork of textures and colour and for years I have used photography to capture this aesthetic, an attempt to encapsulate my experiences. For my final project I have adopted this approach again, taking photographs that focus primarily on colour, texture and composition. Using jesmonite and plaster as my main components I have applied these three elements to produce a body of work that is tactile, bold and visually appealing. The lightness of the material has allowed them to be created into wearable sculptures, able to move throughout the city, adding to the industrial, colourful and vibrant aesthetics that they were inspired from. 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Lyndsay Fairley. Necklace: Untitled, 2018. Silver, oxidised silver, enamel, stainless steel.. 24 x 1 x 32 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. The basis of my collection is photographs taken from walks along the East Coast of Scotland; I was particularly inspired by the compositions created by materials being washed up there, which have a tactile, spontaneous quality.
. I further abstracted these images by drawing in a very free-manner. Focusing on tone and texture with mark-making, my jewellery is developed from these, exploiting the naturally haphazard qualities of the compositions in my initial source material.
. A selection of brooches, necklaces and individual earrings, my jewellery has a muted colour palette, instead focusing on subtle differences in the surfaces, intended to appear as drawings on the body.. Lyndsay Fairley
Necklace: Untitled, 2018
Silver, oxidised silver, enamel, stainless steel.
24 x 1 x 32 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
The basis of my collection is photographs taken from walks along the East Coast of Scotland; I was particularly inspired by the compositions created by materials being washed up there, which have a tactile, spontaneous quality.
I further abstracted these images by drawing in a very free-manner. Focusing on tone and texture with mark-making, my jewellery is developed from these, exploiting the naturally haphazard qualities of the compositions in my initial source material.
A selection of brooches, necklaces and individual earrings, my jewellery has a muted colour palette, instead focusing on subtle differences in the surfaces, intended to appear as drawings on the body.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Iona Hall. Object: Rock Pool Box, 2018. Silver, lapis bullet stone, black onyx stone.. This collection is a response to my visits to the beaches on Mull, Iona, Skye and those close to my home in the highlands. When I glance across the beach I'm naturally drawn to nature's inconsistencies and organic forms. I wanted to recreate the feeling of collecting beach ‘treasure’ such as the unique features of a pebble, the compulsion to pick it up: a keepsake that demands further exploration. My pieces are made to hold and view from many angles as the design has been considered for both exterior and interior. I capture the idea of fleeting moments of attraction by association with the sense of touch, sound and sight. Using multiple techniques has enabled me to explore different textures, movements and finishes within my work, allowing for a variety of interactions with my pieces.. 6 x 3 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. Iona Hall
Object: Rock Pool Box, 2018
Silver, lapis bullet stone, black onyx stone.
This collection is a response to my visits to the beaches on Mull, Iona, Skye and those close to my home in the highlands. When I glance across the beach I'm naturally drawn to nature's inconsistencies and organic forms. I wanted to recreate the feeling of collecting beach ‘treasure’ such as the unique features of a pebble, the compulsion to pick it up: a keepsake that demands further exploration. My pieces are made to hold and view from many angles as the design has been considered for both exterior and interior. I capture the idea of fleeting moments of attraction by association with the sense of touch, sound and sight. Using multiple techniques has enabled me to explore different textures, movements and finishes within my work, allowing for a variety of interactions with my pieces.

6 x 3 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Kahyung Kim. Object: Untitled, 2018. Silver. 2.8 x 2.4 x 10 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. The project will address my life experience and memory. Each piece is about my battle with things which makes me insecure. My project is a journey to self-discovery and self-examination. Moreover, it is a conversation with myself which is mutually complementary and my attitude of life with endless tension and conflicts. The bodies are based on my life by implication. Specifically, the negative part of myself. Therefore, each piece is not only an object that reveals my hidden emotions and truth, but also a mirror which drags my imagination into the extreme fantasy. By involving of emotions, the body is expressed with a feeling of loneliness, emptiness, and sorrow. The psychological experience of my real life is reflected in the physical body image in my work.. Kahyung Kim
Object: Untitled, 2018
Silver
2.8 x 2.4 x 10 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
The project will address my life experience and memory. Each piece is about my battle with things which makes me insecure. My project is a journey to self-discovery and self-examination. Moreover, it is a conversation with myself which is mutually complementary and my attitude of life with endless tension and conflicts. The bodies are based on my life by implication. Specifically, the negative part of myself. Therefore, each piece is not only an object that reveals my hidden emotions and truth, but also a mirror which drags my imagination into the extreme fantasy. By involving of emotions, the body is expressed with a feeling of loneliness, emptiness, and sorrow. The psychological experience of my real life is reflected in the physical body image in my work.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Debbie King. Necklace: Untitled, 2018. Silver, 18ct gold and enamel.. 18 x 1.5 x 32 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. A collection of work exploring the interactions between jewellery and the body, looking at how jewellery is used as a mechanism for stress release through fidgeting. The work focuses on appealing to the senses of touch and sight using calming colours and repetitive movements to create pieces that act as a soothing presence to the wearer. The visual inspiration was taken from anatomical forms as it runs parallel to how the body fidgets and plays with jewellery.. Debbie King
Necklace: Untitled, 2018
Silver, 18ct gold and enamel.
18 x 1.5 x 32 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
A collection of work exploring the interactions between jewellery and the body, looking at how jewellery is used as a mechanism for stress release through fidgeting. The work focuses on appealing to the senses of touch and sight using calming colours and repetitive movements to create pieces that act as a soothing presence to the wearer. The visual inspiration was taken from anatomical forms as it runs parallel to how the body fidgets and plays with jewellery.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Rosie Souter. Vessel: Untitled, 2018. Silver, brass, jesmonite.. 7 x 7 x 13 cm,  6 x 5 x 3.5 cm. A collection of work inspired by the harbours around the West Coast of Scotland. Looking at the details found within eroded structures, faded ropes and creels in contract with the fluidity of the buoys and working boats. A sense of place and feeling captured through linear markings and light flowing forms. . Rosie Souter
Vessel: Untitled, 2018
Silver, brass, jesmonite.
7 x 7 x 13 cm, 6 x 5 x 3.5 cm
A collection of work inspired by the harbours around the West Coast of Scotland. Looking at the details found within eroded structures, faded ropes and creels in contract with the fluidity of the buoys and working boats. A sense of place and feeling captured through linear markings and light flowing forms. 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Hannah Wood. Necklace: Untitled, 2018. Silver, ocean jasper.. 32 x 14 x 1.5 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. My collection focuses on seeds, considering their cyclical existence in the world. This idea of repetition is a key element of my work: structurally through the use of the chain, visually through various repetitive elements that allude to the natural occurrence of seeds en masse and also the growth of plant-life. Having the ability to transform the state, a seed can be a visual embodiment of energy stored, later transformed into growth and movement in plants. Much of my work contains kinetic energy through the use of dangling elements and flowing chains.. Hannah Wood
Necklace: Untitled, 2018
Silver, ocean jasper.
32 x 14 x 1.5 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
My collection focuses on seeds, considering their cyclical existence in the world. This idea of repetition is a key element of my work: structurally through the use of the chain, visually through various repetitive elements that allude to the natural occurrence of seeds en masse and also the growth of plant-life. Having the ability to transform the state, a seed can be a visual embodiment of energy stored, later transformed into growth and movement in plants. Much of my work contains kinetic energy through the use of dangling elements and flowing chains.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Ellys May Woods. Object: Untitled, 2018. Silver, 18ct yellow gold plating.. 4 x 4  x 4 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. Napkin ring. This collection of silverware is inspired by the contrasts between the Forth Bridges in Scotland. 
. Drawing inspiration from the irregular shapes and forms found within the three bridges’ architecture and the materials used to create such large-scale structures. I wanted to transfer these into precious metal to emphasise their important role as key connectors of land and people.
. I explored the technique of scoring and folding to develop interesting forms from flat sheets of silver, creating functional mini structures as tableware, as well as using etching in various layers to create rough concrete-like textures.. Ellys May Woods
Object: Untitled, 2018
Silver, 18ct yellow gold plating.
4 x 4 x 4 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
Napkin ring

This collection of silverware is inspired by the contrasts between the Forth Bridges in Scotland. 
Drawing inspiration from the irregular shapes and forms found within the three bridges’ architecture and the materials used to create such large-scale structures. I wanted to transfer these into precious metal to emphasise their important role as key connectors of land and people.
I explored the technique of scoring and folding to develop interesting forms from flat sheets of silver, creating functional mini structures as tableware, as well as using etching in various layers to create rough concrete-like textures.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Xingwen Shi. Brooch: Untitled, 2018. Silver, steel, magnet, enamel.. 6 x 6 x 3 cm. Photo by: Shannon Tofts. My work aims to reflect the relationships among rapid development, changing cities and memory. With the surroundings changing constantly, my memory begins turning to blur either. The symbol "Cross" represents demolishment and reestablishment. Where there is a symbol like this, there is a fading memory.. Xingwen Shi
Brooch: Untitled, 2018
Silver, steel, magnet, enamel.
6 x 6 x 3 cm
Photo by: Shannon Tofts
My work aims to reflect the relationships among rapid development, changing cities and memory. With the surroundings changing constantly, my memory begins turning to blur either. The symbol "Cross" represents demolishment and reestablishment. Where there is a symbol like this, there is a fading memory.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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