Back

Glasgow School of Art, Degree Show 2018

Exhibition  /  SchoolsDegreeShow2018  /  02 Jun 2018  -  08 Jun 2018
 
Published: 31.05.2018
Rowan Berry. Object: Circinus, 2018. 18ct fairtrade gold.. 2.4 x 2.4 x 0.1 cm. Photo by: Rowan Berry. My work explores, reinterprets and subverts a visual language that connects to some of our greatest ontological needs, hopes and emotions. Some examples of this symbolism include the repeated use of circles, knots, constellations, spirals, crosses and hands. Inspiration has been drawn from mythologies, stories of the earth, talismanic objects and folk history. The visual aesthetic of the pieces does not suggest a time period. The objects I create are abstract – but their intention is to provide a comfort, hold a promise, wish, feelings of love or prayer, and help the owner better understand and cope with the world.
.  
. I use engraving, low-resolution 3d printing and etching to provide texture. I leave solder and laser weld joins visible and accepts printing flaws and imperfections from the casting process as an important part of the work as it documents the process of making. This is a reference to historical objects and a contemporary interpretation of historical objects such as pots with fingerprints visible imprinted in the clay. These textures connect visually to fingerprints, wrinkles on skin and the woven layers in textiles. The pieces are mainly 3d printed and then cast into precious and non-precious metal. The pieces also have elements created by hand as well as suggestions of handwriting. By this, I mean a sense of instinctive drawing through engraving on some of the pieces – as well as the translation of the imperfect handwritten shapes into 3d prints through CAD modelling. This exploration of contrasting techniques and binaries will be seen elsewhere in polished and rough surfaces, x and o shapes and organic and ordered forms.
.  
. These objects generally stand alone, often having no natural front or back, with some having the ability to be worn or attached to the body. They are the size to fit in the hand to encourage our instinctive draw to hold, feel and keep objects close to our skin and take comfort from this. These objects are ambiguous in how they are to be used or worn – allowing the owner to find a solution that best suits them. I imagine that the pieces could be sewn onto clothing, hidden in a pocket, threaded with a cord and worn around the neck, or held in the hand. They have a sense of being spiritual or talismanic.. Rowan Berry
Object: Circinus, 2018
18ct fairtrade gold.
2.4 x 2.4 x 0.1 cm
Photo by: Rowan Berry
My work explores, reinterprets and subverts a visual language that connects to some of our greatest ontological needs, hopes and emotions. Some examples of this symbolism include the repeated use of circles, knots, constellations, spirals, crosses and hands. Inspiration has been drawn from mythologies, stories of the earth, talismanic objects and folk history. The visual aesthetic of the pieces does not suggest a time period. The objects I create are abstract – but their intention is to provide a comfort, hold a promise, wish, feelings of love or prayer, and help the owner better understand and cope with the world.
 
I use engraving, low-resolution 3d printing and etching to provide texture. I leave solder and laser weld joins visible and accepts printing flaws and imperfections from the casting process as an important part of the work as it documents the process of making. This is a reference to historical objects and a contemporary interpretation of historical objects such as pots with fingerprints visible imprinted in the clay. These textures connect visually to fingerprints, wrinkles on skin and the woven layers in textiles. The pieces are mainly 3d printed and then cast into precious and non-precious metal. The pieces also have elements created by hand as well as suggestions of handwriting. By this, I mean a sense of instinctive drawing through engraving on some of the pieces – as well as the translation of the imperfect handwritten shapes into 3d prints through CAD modelling. This exploration of contrasting techniques and binaries will be seen elsewhere in polished and rough surfaces, x and o shapes and organic and ordered forms.
 
These objects generally stand alone, often having no natural front or back, with some having the ability to be worn or attached to the body. They are the size to fit in the hand to encourage our instinctive draw to hold, feel and keep objects close to our skin and take comfort from this. These objects are ambiguous in how they are to be used or worn – allowing the owner to find a solution that best suits them. I imagine that the pieces could be sewn onto clothing, hidden in a pocket, threaded with a cord and worn around the neck, or held in the hand. They have a sense of being spiritual or talismanic.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The annual undergraduate Degree Show featuring work from graduating students across the School of Design, School of Fine Art, Innovation School and the Mackintosh School of Architecture. Also running concurrently is the annual Master of Fine Art (MFA) Degree Show at The Glue Factory.