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Cranbrook.

Informed Chaos - Birmingham City School of Jewellery. MA Graduate Show 2017

Exhibition  /  02 Sep 2017  -  10 Sep 2017
Published: 26.10.2017
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© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Birmingham City University’s School of Jewellery is pleased to present Informed Chaos, an exhibition of jewellery and objects from the graduating students of the MA Jewellery, Silversmithing, and Related Products.
The show, held at BCU’s School of Art on Margaret St, was running from  2nd-10th of September 2017.
The exhibition showcases the work of 39 international students, each creating a new series for their final major work. 

Artist list

Jiaming Bao, Ruixuan Chang, Shuming Chen, Yajung Chen, Yiqi Chen, Yulien Chen, Chen Cheng, Hui Fang, Gretal Ferguson, Lanqi Fu, Yaoyu Fu, Yi Guo, Xiao He, Yajie Hu, Yijhu Hunag, Ying Jia, Apinya Jitnipit, Yahui Ke, Zekun Li, Yixin Liang, Qiwei Liu, Shixi Liu, Weifang Liu, Weiqi Liu, Yang Liu, Maral Mamaghanizadeh, Olivia Marsha, Lingwei Shang, Jiahui Sun, Xi Tong, Biyi Wang, Song Wang, Hanbi Xu, Jiangfei Yan, Xiaoye Zhang, Yishan Zhang, Yun Zhang, Zhaodan Zhang, Ruoxue Zhou
Course Director Professor Jivan Astfalck explains that:
Through their creative practice, the students address aspects of the most vital issues in the contemporary applied arts field today, and by questioning what constitutes adornment and how decoration should be defined and executed, they develop their knowledge and understanding of the jewellery and silversmithing discipline.

Each collection represents a year-long exploration into material, form, colour, and technique, resulting in a diverse assortment of unique and unconventional works, as each student pursues their own line of investigation.
These outcomes range from kinetic, mechanical rings that move with the body, or soft felt pieces made to look like stone, to chubby, silversmithed objects drooping over ledges. Others have taken mundane materials such as feathers and paint and transformed them into intriguing wearables, one even cultivating and harvesting materials from their own personal herd of silk worms.
 

Contact

For further information please contact us via email bcumajewel2017@mail.com
or follow Informed Chaos on social media through Twitter, Instagram, Weibo or Wechat. 
More completed work please visit website: http://informedchaos2017.weebly.com/
Hui Fang. Brooch: Stich, 2017. Fabric, brass.. 8 x 8 x 2 cm. My project was influenced by the natural tracing of ageing and using. I tried to explore the relationships between something old and new, ageing and growing, broken and fixed, dead and reborn. Every element and detail of my work explains my concept about ‘patches’, including patterns, materials and forms. Besides, I do not think contemporary jewellery is noble. On the contrary, it comes from our daily life and should be an intimate part of us.. Hui Fang
Brooch: Stich, 2017
Fabric, brass.
8 x 8 x 2 cm
My project was influenced by the natural tracing of ageing and using. I tried to explore the relationships between something old and new, ageing and growing, broken and fixed, dead and reborn. Every element and detail of my work explains my concept about ‘patches’, including patterns, materials and forms. Besides, I do not think contemporary jewellery is noble. On the contrary, it comes from our daily life and should be an intimate part of us.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Gretal Ferguson. Object: Fatroll, 2017. Silver plated gilding metal.. 14 x 12 x 10 cm. Gretal Ferguson’s current work explores the juxtaposition between material and form. Through the use of traditional silversmithing techniques, she turns metal into fat, creating precariously drooping objects imbued with personality.
. Observing the natural movement of fat rolls and flesh creases, Gretal takes these observations and creates her own quirky interpretation of flesh. While far from a straight recreation of fat, the small creases and rolls incorporated into the forms lend character to the objects. These recognisable human traits help to personify the work, as you subconsciously acknowledge something familiar.   
. Heavily influenced by street art and popular culture, the aesthetic of these chubby objects is informed by the plump lines of fat graffiti murals, with the quirky nature of these influences creating something cheeky in the work.
. This cheeky nature can further be seen through stop-motion videos which accompany the objects. The idea of showing these chubby forms gradually drooping and flumping over edges further informs the shape of the objects, with each piece representing a stage in the fast progression. This paired with the precarious nature of the objects installation creates a distinct sense of movement throughout the series.. Gretal Ferguson
Object: Fatroll, 2017
Silver plated gilding metal.
14 x 12 x 10 cm
Gretal Ferguson’s current work explores the juxtaposition between material and form. Through the use of traditional silversmithing techniques, she turns metal into fat, creating precariously drooping objects imbued with personality.
Observing the natural movement of fat rolls and flesh creases, Gretal takes these observations and creates her own quirky interpretation of flesh. While far from a straight recreation of fat, the small creases and rolls incorporated into the forms lend character to the objects. These recognisable human traits help to personify the work, as you subconsciously acknowledge something familiar.   
Heavily influenced by street art and popular culture, the aesthetic of these chubby objects is informed by the plump lines of fat graffiti murals, with the quirky nature of these influences creating something cheeky in the work.
This cheeky nature can further be seen through stop-motion videos which accompany the objects. The idea of showing these chubby forms gradually drooping and flumping over edges further informs the shape of the objects, with each piece representing a stage in the fast progression. This paired with the precarious nature of the objects installation creates a distinct sense of movement throughout the series.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Yajie Hu. Brooch: Untitled, 2017. Acrylic paint.. 15 x 8 x 6 cm. As an artist, I am naturally attracted to colour and texture, as well as art as a tangible, wearable object. I investigate the colours, textures and shapes of some interesting animals, such as snakes and chameleons. I also study the striking colours of carnivorous plants as their approach is to attract insects into their deadly clutches. These interests have inspired me to create my jewellery collections.
. I primarily work with acrylic paint as my ideas are best expressed through it. Working with acrylic paint allows me to be in direct contact with colour. I therefore not only investigate its visual qualities but also explore it as a useable material. At the same time, my designs are based on organic forms, which are then transformed and designed into my own aesthetic pieces. I aim for my designs to be worn on the body, but also to be valued as art objects.. Yajie Hu
Brooch: Untitled, 2017
Acrylic paint.
15 x 8 x 6 cm
As an artist, I am naturally attracted to colour and texture, as well as art as a tangible, wearable object. I investigate the colours, textures and shapes of some interesting animals, such as snakes and chameleons. I also study the striking colours of carnivorous plants as their approach is to attract insects into their deadly clutches. These interests have inspired me to create my jewellery collections.
I primarily work with acrylic paint as my ideas are best expressed through it. Working with acrylic paint allows me to be in direct contact with colour. I therefore not only investigate its visual qualities but also explore it as a useable material. At the same time, my designs are based on organic forms, which are then transformed and designed into my own aesthetic pieces. I aim for my designs to be worn on the body, but also to be valued as art objects.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Olivia Marsha. Brooch: Untitled, 2017. Resin, copper.. 13 x 12 x 7 cm. My work explores the tangible balance between repulsive and attractive, exposing various growths beyond the bounds of the body. Each piece acts as an extension of our inner self, bared to the foreign outside. 
. Skin, being the barrier between our inner and outer self, is often portrayed as a vessel, an embodiment of our identity. Our skin is distinctively our own; personal, it reveals yet conceals oneself.
. Through my pieces, I aim to evoke questions of what if: What if you had my identity? What would you do with it?. Olivia Marsha
Brooch: Untitled, 2017
Resin, copper.
13 x 12 x 7 cm
My work explores the tangible balance between repulsive and attractive, exposing various growths beyond the bounds of the body. Each piece acts as an extension of our inner self, bared to the foreign outside. 
Skin, being the barrier between our inner and outer self, is often portrayed as a vessel, an embodiment of our identity. Our skin is distinctively our own; personal, it reveals yet conceals oneself.
Through my pieces, I aim to evoke questions of what if: What if you had my identity? What would you do with it?

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Biyi Wang. Object: Untitled, 2017. Wood. 12 x 4 x 4 cm. As a Chinese artist, Bi-yi Wang (Brigitte) her cultural background and environment have been an important source of inspiration for her work. At the same time, she believes that ‘these connections can be represented in the form of the human body. It could be said that we do not just exist on the surface of our skin but also in the inside of our internal organs. We are shaped not only by our individual identity but also through our relationship with our environment and others.
. Exploring these ideas, she creates objects that combine inside and outside, natural elements and man-made materials. Using plastic and metal elements to contain the inner wood part. This project cutlery and jewellery is her second family that you can wear with, share the memories and wear them to everywhere.. Biyi Wang
Object: Untitled, 2017
Wood
12 x 4 x 4 cm
As a Chinese artist, Bi-yi Wang (Brigitte) her cultural background and environment have been an important source of inspiration for her work. At the same time, she believes that ‘these connections can be represented in the form of the human body. It could be said that we do not just exist on the surface of our skin but also in the inside of our internal organs. We are shaped not only by our individual identity but also through our relationship with our environment and others.
Exploring these ideas, she creates objects that combine inside and outside, natural elements and man-made materials. Using plastic and metal elements to contain the inner wood part. This project cutlery and jewellery is her second family that you can wear with, share the memories and wear them to everywhere.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Hanbi Xu. Necklace: Untitled, 2017. Clay, glass, seed beads, calico fabric.. 20 x 20 x 4 cm. Hanbi Xu
Necklace: Untitled, 2017
Clay, glass, seed beads, calico fabric.
20 x 20 x 4 cm
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jiangfei Yan. Brooch: Untitled, 2017. Feathers, acrylic.. 8 x 8 x 2 cm. I have always been interested in films as long as I can remember. This stems back to my experience as an undergraduate student in China. However, the ideas I explore in my collection started with a particular film, Black Swan. I was fascinated by the way the film compares birds with humans, both contained and protected by feathers or skin. At the same time, I am interested in the lines suggested by movement. I began by creating series of photographs in low shutter speed to capture the movement of birds flying and people dancing. My designs are the result of an exploration of texture, as the one of human skin or feathers, and line as a representation of motion. The choice of materials is both conceptual and aesthetic. I combine real feathers, which I re-shape, and structure, with acrylic pieces covered by photographs. I draw from the visual qualities of these elements, creating pieces in light pink or neutral colours to resemble both birds and skin tones. Simplicity, softness and subtleness are aspects of my work that are also important to me.. Jiangfei Yan
Brooch: Untitled, 2017
Feathers, acrylic.
8 x 8 x 2 cm
I have always been interested in films as long as I can remember. This stems back to my experience as an undergraduate student in China. However, the ideas I explore in my collection started with a particular film, Black Swan. I was fascinated by the way the film compares birds with humans, both contained and protected by feathers or skin. At the same time, I am interested in the lines suggested by movement. I began by creating series of photographs in low shutter speed to capture the movement of birds flying and people dancing. My designs are the result of an exploration of texture, as the one of human skin or feathers, and line as a representation of motion. The choice of materials is both conceptual and aesthetic. I combine real feathers, which I re-shape, and structure, with acrylic pieces covered by photographs. I draw from the visual qualities of these elements, creating pieces in light pink or neutral colours to resemble both birds and skin tones. Simplicity, softness and subtleness are aspects of my work that are also important to me.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Linwei Shang. Brooch: Untitled, 2017. Silver, wood.. 8 x 9 x 7 cm. My works, on the one hand, emphasize the combination of geometric shapes and random lines. On the other hand, attempt the techniques called “metal inlay” (inlay silver into wood) and “stone inlay”(inlay stones into wood).
. The existing plants and flowers in the world now are almost all formed by random, smooth and beautiful lines. My idea was to combine the geometric shapes and random lines to create my own peculiar plant forms. To create a strong and attractive garden of my own.
. Hand-painted the flowers and plants graphics, cutting off into many small geometric shapes, made with solid geometric wood pieces and add details and textures with other metals or stones to achieve the perfect combination of geometric shapes and random lines.. Linwei Shang
Brooch: Untitled, 2017
Silver, wood.
8 x 9 x 7 cm
My works, on the one hand, emphasize the combination of geometric shapes and random lines. On the other hand, attempt the techniques called “metal inlay” (inlay silver into wood) and “stone inlay”(inlay stones into wood).
The existing plants and flowers in the world now are almost all formed by random, smooth and beautiful lines. My idea was to combine the geometric shapes and random lines to create my own peculiar plant forms. To create a strong and attractive garden of my own.
Hand-painted the flowers and plants graphics, cutting off into many small geometric shapes, made with solid geometric wood pieces and add details and textures with other metals or stones to achieve the perfect combination of geometric shapes and random lines.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Yi-Jhu Huang. Necklace: Untitled, 2017. Wool. 50 x 30 x 10 cm. Yi-Jhu Huang’s collection explores the ancient, original relationship between rocks and human beings. Looking back in time, at the beginning of human kind, there was a bond between stones and people. Rocks were used as weapons for protection, as mark making instruments, and as tools for creating objects. Stones connect us with our past and our fundamental role as makers. Her pieces explore this triangular relationship between the artist, the tool and the material.
. Wool felt is considered to be the oldest known textile, which was widely used in clothing, rugs and tents. Just like rocks, felting is close to the life of humans from ancient times. Although wool and rocks produce an opposite sense of touch and vision, they both, in different ways, suggest protection. At the same time, Yi-Jhu believes that the neutral colours of rocks create a restful, calm and cooling effect that she wishes her audience will perceive.. Yi-Jhu Huang
Necklace: Untitled, 2017
Wool
50 x 30 x 10 cm
Yi-Jhu Huang’s collection explores the ancient, original relationship between rocks and human beings. Looking back in time, at the beginning of human kind, there was a bond between stones and people. Rocks were used as weapons for protection, as mark making instruments, and as tools for creating objects. Stones connect us with our past and our fundamental role as makers. Her pieces explore this triangular relationship between the artist, the tool and the material.
Wool felt is considered to be the oldest known textile, which was widely used in clothing, rugs and tents. Just like rocks, felting is close to the life of humans from ancient times. Although wool and rocks produce an opposite sense of touch and vision, they both, in different ways, suggest protection. At the same time, Yi-Jhu believes that the neutral colours of rocks create a restful, calm and cooling effect that she wishes her audience will perceive.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Maral Mamaghanizadeh. Brooch: Untitled, 2017. Hair. 10 x 10 x 5 cm. Drawing on my own roots as an Iranian woman, and my interest in feminism, I explored the issue of the hijab [veil]. As a woman in Iran, you are not allowed to uncover your hair, talk about feminism or sexuality as these are forbidden matters. Looking at this problem from outside, and understanding the equality of men and women suggested that hair as a material could represent the long-term political struggle that existed in my country. I explored this conceptually by creating a series of brooches with my own and other friends’ hair. The brooch symbolizes our own individual characters and personality coming together, and the stories that we, as women, reflect upon.
. Moreover, the shape of the coconut shell resembles women’s breasts. This part of a woman’s body, therefore, challenges most of us from Iran in wearing it, because of the uncomfortable connotations relating to our culture.. Maral Mamaghanizadeh
Brooch: Untitled, 2017
Hair
10 x 10 x 5 cm
Drawing on my own roots as an Iranian woman, and my interest in feminism, I explored the issue of the hijab [veil]. As a woman in Iran, you are not allowed to uncover your hair, talk about feminism or sexuality as these are forbidden matters. Looking at this problem from outside, and understanding the equality of men and women suggested that hair as a material could represent the long-term political struggle that existed in my country. I explored this conceptually by creating a series of brooches with my own and other friends’ hair. The brooch symbolizes our own individual characters and personality coming together, and the stories that we, as women, reflect upon.
Moreover, the shape of the coconut shell resembles women’s breasts. This part of a woman’s body, therefore, challenges most of us from Iran in wearing it, because of the uncomfortable connotations relating to our culture.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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