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Meret Oppenheim. Fur and Other Bits and Pieces

Exhibition  /  15 Jan 2006  -  07 May 2006
Published: 30.01.2007
SM’s – Stedelijk Museum ’s-Hertogenbosch
Meret Oppenheim. Necklace: Untitled, 1934/1936. Meret Oppenheim
Necklace: Untitled, 1934/1936
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Intro
(...) shared the Surrealists’ passion for turning everyday objects into something extraordinary: rings clad with snakeskin, a necklace consisting of a string of miniature bones (...)

Oppenheim was one of the most high-profile women artists of the twentieth century. Wayward and self-confident, she embarked on her career at a time when the art world was completely male-dominated. Her talents won her universal respect and friends of the calibre of Man Ray and Picasso. She felt at home among the Surrealist artists of Paris - figures like Max Ernst, Marcel Duchamp, André Breton, Francis Picabia and Hans Arp – and she acquired almost overnight fame when, as a joke, she covered a cup and saucer with fur (1936). The object was immediately snapped up for the collection of MoMa in New York, where it has been treasured ever since as an icon of Surrealism known as the ‘Déjeuner en Fourrure’. Oppenheim possessed a wide range of lents.
She wrote, painted and produced items of furniture, clothing and jewellery.
She shared the Surrealists’ passion for turning everyday objects into something extraordinary: rings clad with snakeskin, a necklace consisting of a string of miniature bones, a hat in the shape of a canine head with gaping jaws and slavering tongue - all products of Oppenheim’s rich imagination, and all on show in this exhibition.

After her career was interrupted by the rise of National Socialism and the outbreak of the World War II, she made her come-back in 1954. Numerous solo and group exhibitions followed, including participation in Dokumenta in 1982. She lived and worked alternately in Paris and in Basel, where she died in 1985.
By covering objects with fur and using other natural materials, or by endowing items of furniture with animal legs, Oppenheim explored the relationships between culture and nature, men and women, day and night, and dream and reality.

Remarks


The exhibition is accompanied by a 256-page bilingual (English-German) publication entitled “From Breakfast in Fur and Back Again / Die Pelztasse war nur der Anfang”, ed. Thomas Levy, including a contribution by Belinda Grace Gardner (on sale at the museum).



Opening hours:

Tuesday & Thursday: 1 pm – 9 pm
Wednesday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday: 1 pm – 5 pm
Closed on Monday and Christmas Day.
Meret Oppenheim. Necklace: Tête du poète, 1966/1967 and 1977. Gold, enamel. Meret Oppenheim
Necklace: Tête du poète, 1966/1967 and 1977
Gold, enamel
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Meret Oppenheim. Necklace: Untitled, 1937. Meret, OppenheimNecklace / neckpiece: 1937. Meret Oppenheim
Necklace: Untitled, 1937


Meret, Oppenheim
Necklace / neckpiece: 1937

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Meret Oppenheim. Ring: Untitled, 1985. Gold, rubies. Meret, OppenheimRing: 1985Gold, rubies. Meret Oppenheim
Ring: Untitled, 1985
Gold, rubies


Meret, Oppenheim
Ring: 1985
Gold, rubies

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Meret Oppenheim. Ring: Untitled, 1985. Meret, OppenheimRing: 1985. Meret Oppenheim
Ring: Untitled, 1985


Meret, Oppenheim
Ring: 1985

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Meret Oppenheim. Ring: Untitled, 1985. Meret, OppenheimRing: 1985. Meret Oppenheim
Ring: Untitled, 1985


Meret, Oppenheim
Ring: 1985

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
View of the exhibition.
View of the exhibition

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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