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MUDAC: From Our Reserve Holdings

Exhibition  /  19 Oct 2012  -  19 Nov 2012
Published: 19.10.2012
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Intro
The MUDAC becomes the first museum in Switzerland to dedicate a permanent exhibition room to contemporary jewelry. This latest gallery, in the Gaudard room, bearing witness of the history of the building, serves to showcase collection previously hidden to the public.

Artist list

Otto Künzli, Christoph Zellweger, Susanne Klemm, Sonia Morel, Johanna Dahm, David Bielander, Sophie Hanagarth, Bernhard Schobinger, Verena Sieber-Fuchs.
Inauguration of a new permanent exhibition room devoted to contemporary jewelry.

Two remarkable jewelry collections are in safekeeping at the mudac: the mudac’s and the Swiss Confederation’s, for which the mudac makes regular acquisitions. Strong of almost 200 pieces, these collections reflect the developments marking a realm eternally in effervescence.

The MUDAC becomes the first museum in Switzerland to dedicate a permanent exhibition room to contemporary jewelry. This latest gallery, in the Gaudard room, bearing witness of the history of the building, serves to showcase collection previously hidden to the public. It is also intended for periodic shows featuring a selection of works from our ceramics and design collections. Visitors will discover these varied objects in a succession of thematic exhibitions, with a first show under the heading of What is it that renders contemporary jewelry precious? 

What Is It That Renders Contemporary Jewelry Pieces Precious?
The traditional definition of a jewel is that of a finely worked small object rendered precious by the material itself or the work entailed, and serving as an ornamental accessory.
When contemporary jewelers use traditional metals to create ornamental accessories, they defy convention by scratching or brushing the gold, or by blackening the silver, aging it or depriving it of its gloss. The resulting patina in both cases is a far cry from the brilliant finish generally associated with Western jewelry.
When, however, they resort to base materials, it is their manner of transcending these that renders the pieces precious. They will, for instance, turn plastic wrap into a pearl, a bank note into a cameo. Our consumer society’s daily scraps are brought back to life as jewelry pieces in all their splendor. Moreover, the ingenuity of some of these jewelry designers has led them to come up with new attachment systems, to reinvent clips for jewelry pieces that integrate them into the body or garment to which they belong in ever more elaborate fashion. And yet, above and beyond all these considerations, what all these creations have in common is the painstaking work-manship that they entail. Every one of them bears witness to the intelligence of the hands that shaped them. 

Contemporary Jewelry.
Already in the ‘60s, contemporary jewelry freed itself from what by then was deemed a devitalized tradition, and from industrial production subservient to market laws. Instead, jewelry creators claimed an artistic status born of a wide aesthetic spectrum: from purist minimalism to unbridled fantasy, from abstraction to figuration. Many from their ranks aimed beyond the purely decorative, concerning themselves instead with the social, cultural and relational ramifications of jewelry.
By the ‘80s, contemporary jewelry turned openly anti-establishment. Exploring its limits, resorting at times to performances and installations, it drew closer to contemporary art. Over the last twenty years, however, contemporary jewelry has evolved from manifesto-like stands alone towards, as well, personal claims on behalf of the individual—as much for the jewelry’s designers as for whoever acquires it. 

The Maison Gaudard: From The Golsmiths Of Yore To The Jewelers Of Today
The mudac moved into the Maison Gaudard in June 2000. This venue groups several buildings whose oldest remains hark back to the 13th century. Relevant sources discolose some of its proprietors, including a number of goldsmiths: for the east row, there is mention of Pierre and his brother Jean, who may have commissioned the north house between 1261 and 1268. A goldsmith named Perrot Dorer lived here from the end of the 13th century to about 1340. As to the west row, the record show that Mermet Périsset and his family were in residence there from 1386 until the second half of the 15th century.
When, in 2012, one of the building’s oldest room showcased the contemporary jewlery collections of both the museum and Confederation, past and present at last met up with each other.


Opening Friday, October 19, 2012 at 6 pm. Official ceremony at 6:30pm
Exhibition curator and designer: Carole Guinard, in charge of the contemporary jewelry collections
Press conference Friday, October 19, 2012 at 2 pm
Exhibition From October 20, 2012, on 
Guided tours Wednesday, December 5, 2012 et February 27, 2013 at 12.15 pm
Opening hours Tu-Sun 11am-6pm. Open on holidays (incl. Mondays), and Mondays in July and August.
 
Bernhard Schobinger. Necklace: Bottlenecklace, 2012. Bottlenecks, cotton. Collection de la Confédération 
. Photographie © Alain Kissling, Lausanne. Bernhard Schobinger
Necklace: Bottlenecklace, 2012
Bottlenecks, cotton
Collection de la Confédération
Photographie © Alain Kissling, Lausanne

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Otto Künzli. Bracelet: Gold makes you blind, 1987. Gold, rubber. Ø 8,3 cm. Photo by: © Olivier Laffely/AN. Part of: Collection de la Confédération. Otto Künzli
Bracelet: Gold makes you blind, 1987
Gold, rubber
Ø 8,3 cm
Photo by: © Olivier Laffely/AN
Part of: Collection de la Confédération
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Christoph Zellweger. Bracelet: Rhizome, 2006. Natural rubber. 10.5 x 13.5 cm. Collection de la Confédération 
. Photographie @ Julie Varcin/CEPV. Christoph Zellweger
Bracelet: Rhizome, 2006
Natural rubber
10.5 x 13.5 cm
Collection de la Confédération
Photographie @ Julie Varcin/CEPV

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David Bielander. Bracelet: Scampi, 2008. Copper stained silver, rubber bands. Collection de la Confédération. David Bielander
Bracelet: Scampi, 2008
Copper stained silver, rubber bands
Collection de la Confédération
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Sophie Hanagarth. Necklace: Toison aux pattes d’or, 2004. Wire, gilt brass. 70 x 11 x 0.5 cm. Sophie, HanagarthNecklace: Toison aux pattes d’or, 2004Wire, gilt brass70 x 11 x 0.5 cmCollection de la Confédération 
. Photographie © Natacha Girard/CEPV. Sophie Hanagarth
Necklace: Toison aux pattes d’or, 2004
Wire, gilt brass
70 x 11 x 0.5 cm


Sophie, Hanagarth
Necklace: Toison aux pattes d’or, 2004
Wire, gilt brass
70 x 11 x 0.5 cm
Collection de la Confédération
Photographie © Natacha Girard/CEPV

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Johanna Dahm. Ring: Fast Ashanti, 2006. silver, gold. 2.5 x 4 x 1 cm. Collection de la Confédéraion 
. Photographie © Christophe Press/CEPV. Johanna Dahm
Ring: Fast Ashanti, 2006
silver, gold
2.5 x 4 x 1 cm
Collection de la Confédéraion
Photographie © Christophe Press/CEPV

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