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Near and Far

Exhibition  /  06 May 2009  -  11 Nov 2009
Published: 01.05.2009
Kulttuurien Museo
Management:
Eija-Maija Kotilainen
.

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Intro
The Near and Far exhibition arose out of a group of Finnish and international jewelry artists experiencing the Museum of Cultures’ permanent exhibition, Fetched from Afar, from a fresh perspective.
The Near and Far exhibition arose out of a group of Finnish and international jewelry artists experiencing the Museum of Cultures’ permanent exhibition, Fetched from Afar, from a fresh perspective. The artists were taken on an adventure into the unknown and were exposed to a host of cultural-historical objects. The jewelry exhibition was built around 21 items of interest from the Fetched from Afar exhibition, and 20 jewelry artists from Finland and abroad were invited to contribute to it. Each artist chose one of the items as the point of departure for their creative work. The Fetched from Afar exhibition has, in other words, reached far to answer some of the questions relating to cultures and the art of jewelry making.

Is that a little far fetched?
The story of an object is often at the core of a jewelry artist’s work. Shapes, materials and techniques reveal the history of an object and speak to today’s jewelry-maker. They are collectors of narratives, but also storytellers themselves, looking for stories that they might translate into the language of jewelry.

Through the methods of jewelry art, the artists featured in the exhibition have made a personal intervention into an object that was foreign and unfamiliar to them. How does a mystical figure resembling a mermaid awake the imagination? How does a photograph displayed in a glass cabinet appeal to one’s emotions? On the other hand, the questions a visitor may ask might include “What is jewelry art?”, “What kinds of works will come from this kind of approach?” and so on.

The permanent exhibition of the Museum of Cultures may be viewed as a huge sketch book: stories about the places from where the objects came and how they ended up in the museum collections, all forming a network of paths that lead to surprising places and interpretations. How cultures are portrayed is based on explorations and souvenirs. A path that winds and meanders, branches out and sometimes almost disappears, usually ends up surprisingly close to the initial point of departure.

Activities

The Jewelry Art Association will organise a talk at the Museum of Cultures on Saturday 9 May, at 12 noon.
Workshops
are organised for schoolchildren from 26 to 30 October

The updated programme schedules can be found on the website of the Museum of Cultures at www.kulttuurienmuseo.fi.

Remarks

Partners

The exhibition has been realised in co-operation with the Jewelry Art Association. The association is the oldest nationwide jewelry association in Finland, and it was established in 2005. Its purpose is to promote contemporary jewelry art in Finland as a form or art and design. It also aims to promote Finnish jewelry art internationally. For more information and other association projects, please visit the website at www.korutaideyhdistys.fi.

The exhibition team of the Jewelry Art Association: Anna Rikkinen, Nelli Tanner, Aura Kajas and Kaisa Nyberg

Exhibition graphics: Heidi Gabrielsson

The exhibition has received generous support from the National Council for Design, the Finnish Cultural Foundation, the Ministry of Education and Vantaa Reuse Centre Ltd. 

Contact

Further information

Nelli Tanner
Jewelry Art Association
Tel 040 - 5208776
nelli.tanner@elisanet.fi

Pilvi Vainonen
Curator of Education, Museum of Cultures
Tel (09) 4050 9809
pilvi.vainonen@nba.fi

Jorge Manilla. Brooch: Encadenadas / Bounded, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä. Jorge Manilla
Brooch: Encadenadas / Bounded, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä
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Gemma Draper. Brooch: One Approach and Two Finds, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä. Gemma Draper
Brooch: One Approach and Two Finds, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä
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Javier Moreno Frías. Brooch: Toxic Study 2, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä. Javier Moreno Frías
Brooch: Toxic Study 2, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä
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Sari Liimatta. Sculpture: Memento mori, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä. Sari Liimatta
Sculpture: Memento mori, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä
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Ketli Tiitsar. Brooch: Red, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Dénes Farkas. Ketli Tiitsar
Brooch: Red, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Dénes Farkas
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Terhi Tolvanen. Brooch: Gouttes de Printemps / Kevään pisarat, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä. Terhi Tolvanen
Brooch: Gouttes de Printemps / Kevään pisarat, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä
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Tanel Veenre. Brooch: Mermaid, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä. Tanel Veenre
Brooch: Mermaid, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä
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Francis Willemstijn. Brooch: Untitled / Nimetön, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Francis Willemstijn. Francis Willemstijn
Brooch: Untitled / Nimetön, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Francis Willemstijn
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Luzia Vogt. Brooch: The Pretence, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä. Luzia Vogt
Brooch: The Pretence, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä
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Jeannette Jansen. Brooch: So nice you take over, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä. Jeannette Jansen
Brooch: So nice you take over, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä
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Mia Maljojoki. Brooch: Vaikutus I / Effect I, 2009. Mixed media. Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä. Mia Maljojoki
Brooch: Vaikutus I / Effect I, 2009
Mixed media
Photo: Kimmo Heikkilä
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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