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Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp. MA Degree Show 2018

Exhibition  /  SchoolsDegreeShow2018  /  22 Jun 2018  -  26 Aug 2018
Published: 09.06.2018
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© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The Masters Students Jewellery Design of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp kindly invite you to their final graduation show, featuring mysterious vessels, smooth jade curves and delicate steel chains.

Artist list

Zeyun Chen, Emma Gregory, Xinyuan Hu
At her jewellery store in the historical district of Antwerp, Salima Thakker introduces for the third time, three MA graduation projects from the Jewellery department of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp.

Being a graduate herself from this department in 1997, she is convinced that this is a great opportunity for the graduates to show their projects in a challenging environment and come across professionals and potential buyers and collectors.

The graduation projects will be shown during the summer; whilst her own collection will be shown in her summer store in Knokke, Zeedijk 728.

Hours

Friday to Sunday, 11:00 - 18:00 h.

Opening

Thursday 21st of June1 from 8:00 to 21:00 h.
Salima Thakker - Jewellery Store - Exhibition Location.
Salima Thakker - Jewellery Store - Exhibition Location

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Emma Gregory. Bracelet: Watercolours and What I'm Looking For, 2018. Laser-welded stainless steel, Nano-ceramic e-coating.. Photo by: Zuzanna Głód. From series: Polyrhythmic. Hand model: Emma MF Gregory and Ivo van Herreweghe.
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. Emma Gregory (1991) is a Masters student of the Jewellery Design, Gold and Silversmithing Department at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp. Before this she obtained a Bachelors degree from the Glasgow School of Art and a state certification from the Goldschmiedeschule in Pforzheim. 
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. Emma has been developing a unique form of wearable musical notation for electronic dance music. Through her own interpretation of the music, highly polished stainless steel wires are laser-welded into tiny, detailed shapes that match the rhythms and harmonies. The songs are transformed into precious necklaces, bracelets - long chains designed to be wrapped around the body and kept close like treasured artefacts.  
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. Her research led her to enrol in a master-class on typography and writing systems, and an electronic music course at the Royal Conservatoire of Antwerp. She chose to focus on electronic dance music because she sees unique similarities in the balance between research, technique and artistry achieved in both jewellery design and the production of dance music. . Emma Gregory
Bracelet: Watercolours and What I'm Looking For, 2018
Laser-welded stainless steel, Nano-ceramic e-coating.
Photo by: Zuzanna Głód
From series: Polyrhythmic
Hand model: Emma MF Gregory and Ivo van Herreweghe.
 
Emma Gregory (1991) is a Masters student of the Jewellery Design, Gold and Silversmithing Department at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp. Before this she obtained a Bachelors degree from the Glasgow School of Art and a state certification from the Goldschmiedeschule in Pforzheim. 
 
Emma has been developing a unique form of wearable musical notation for electronic dance music. Through her own interpretation of the music, highly polished stainless steel wires are laser-welded into tiny, detailed shapes that match the rhythms and harmonies. The songs are transformed into precious necklaces, bracelets - long chains designed to be wrapped around the body and kept close like treasured artefacts.  
 
Her research led her to enrol in a master-class on typography and writing systems, and an electronic music course at the Royal Conservatoire of Antwerp. She chose to focus on electronic dance music because she sees unique similarities in the balance between research, technique and artistry achieved in both jewellery design and the production of dance music. 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Zeyun Chen. Object: Previously Underground, 2018. Potato, sweet potato, taro, purple sweet potato.. Photo by: Molly Kwok. What is value? This is a question that Zeyun is fascinated by and which forms the core of her Masters' project. At first glance, you might not recognise the material she has used to create her objects. Could it be wood? Bone? Or is it a precious material such as coral, shell or ivory - materials that are worth treasuring? Her objects are, in fact, made of potato.  
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. The potato is a very common, hardy vegetable with a very colourful history. Originally from Peru, the potato was first introduced to Europeans by the Spanish and was not thought highly of until food shortages and famines forced the meat-loving citizens of England and France to turn to the food they had reserved for animals. With this, the potato saved lives and it is hard for us now to imagine how valuable the potato was to those suffering from famine. Most people today think potatoes are very ordinary; a common starch, only to be used to soak up the gravy from a delicious meal. 
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. When these vegetables are hand carved and dehydrated, they become sturdy and tough. The sweet potato and taro vegetables come in bright shades of purple and orange, while the common baking potato gives a wonderfully delicate ivory. Zeyun became obsessed with potatoes and has created a collection celebrating its features and complex relationship to value. . Zeyun Chen
Object: Previously Underground, 2018
Potato, sweet potato, taro, purple sweet potato.
Photo by: Molly Kwok
What is value? This is a question that Zeyun is fascinated by and which forms the core of her Masters' project. At first glance, you might not recognise the material she has used to create her objects. Could it be wood? Bone? Or is it a precious material such as coral, shell or ivory - materials that are worth treasuring? Her objects are, in fact, made of potato.  
 
The potato is a very common, hardy vegetable with a very colourful history. Originally from Peru, the potato was first introduced to Europeans by the Spanish and was not thought highly of until food shortages and famines forced the meat-loving citizens of England and France to turn to the food they had reserved for animals. With this, the potato saved lives and it is hard for us now to imagine how valuable the potato was to those suffering from famine. Most people today think potatoes are very ordinary; a common starch, only to be used to soak up the gravy from a delicious meal. 
 
When these vegetables are hand carved and dehydrated, they become sturdy and tough. The sweet potato and taro vegetables come in bright shades of purple and orange, while the common baking potato gives a wonderfully delicate ivory. Zeyun became obsessed with potatoes and has created a collection celebrating its features and complex relationship to value. 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Xinyuan Hu. Bangle: A Bangle from Another Angle, 2018. White jade, laquer with gold powder, green jade, HETIAN jade, 3D print polyamide, iron.. Photo by: Guo Rong. Hu Xinyuan (1991, China) obtained her BA degree in Product Design from Ningbo University, then spent one year doing an internship at a jewellery design company. This experience prompted her to begin to explore the world of jewellery. 
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. In Belgium, she completed a BA in Jewellery Design, Gold and Silversmithing at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp and is currently finishing her MA degree. 
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. In western culture, a marriage proposal is not complete without a diamond engagement ring. It is such a common tradition, that it is hard to believe it is the result of a successful advertising campaign by De Beers, started only 75 years ago.  
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. In Chinese culture, the jade bangle has a similar meaning to the engagement ring. Jade bangles are given to the future fiancé as part of the proposal - their perfect circular shape is a symbol of eternal love and a blissful union. But Xinyuan believes that love can be seen from different perspectives and that each relationship deserves a unique symbol to represent the many facets and varieties of love that exist. 
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. For her Master's project, Xinyuan has reinterpreted the classic round jade bangle using 3D CAD software and traditional stone cutting techniques to create a collection of bangles. Through her work, she has developed a relationship between material and shape to create multiple versions of the original, traditional bangle - A bangle from another angle. . Xinyuan Hu
Bangle: A Bangle from Another Angle, 2018
White jade, laquer with gold powder, green jade, HETIAN jade, 3D print polyamide, iron.
Photo by: Guo Rong
Hu Xinyuan (1991, China) obtained her BA degree in Product Design from Ningbo University, then spent one year doing an internship at a jewellery design company. This experience prompted her to begin to explore the world of jewellery. 
 
In Belgium, she completed a BA in Jewellery Design, Gold and Silversmithing at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp and is currently finishing her MA degree. 
 
In western culture, a marriage proposal is not complete without a diamond engagement ring. It is such a common tradition, that it is hard to believe it is the result of a successful advertising campaign by De Beers, started only 75 years ago.  
 
In Chinese culture, the jade bangle has a similar meaning to the engagement ring. Jade bangles are given to the future fiancé as part of the proposal - their perfect circular shape is a symbol of eternal love and a blissful union. But Xinyuan believes that love can be seen from different perspectives and that each relationship deserves a unique symbol to represent the many facets and varieties of love that exist. 
 
For her Master's project, Xinyuan has reinterpreted the classic round jade bangle using 3D CAD software and traditional stone cutting techniques to create a collection of bangles. Through her work, she has developed a relationship between material and shape to create multiple versions of the original, traditional bangle - A bangle from another angle. 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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