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Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp. MA Degree Show 2019

Exhibition  /  SchoolsDegreeShow2019   EmergingValues  /  20 Jun 2019  -  01 Sep 2019
Published: 06.06.2019
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© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The Masters Students Jewellery Design of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp kindly invite you to their final graduation show.

Artist list

Youzhi Bi, Vie Stessens, Lera Treyger, Sophia de Groot
Salima Thakker introduces for the fourth time, four MA graduation projects from the Jewellery department of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp. At her jewellery store in the historical district of Antwerp, being a graduate herself from this department in 1997, she is convinced that this is a great opportunity for the graduates to show their projects in a challenging environment and come across professionals and potential buyers and collectors.

Hours

Friday to Sunday, 12 am - 6 pm.

Opening

19th of June, Wednesday, 6.30 pm - 9 pm.
Youzhi Bi. Brooch: Landscape, 2019. Fine silver, stainless steel wire.. 60 x 1 x 7 cm. From series: Trace. 
. Youzhi Bi (b.1995, China) is a master student of the Jewellery Design, Gold & Silversmithing department at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp. Before this, she obtained a Bachelor degree from Sheffield Hallam University in 2016. 
. One of the most exciting moments of her art making is to be encountered with a blank sheet of paper ready to be transformed. Worrying about making it dirty, Youzhi always tries to control the lines of her drawings to be sharp and accurate. 
. However, no paper can stay clean, and no drawing can be perfect. 
. What is believed to be a mistake is actually what makes a drawing a personal distinctive piece of art. 
. She found a way to keep that sensation of drawing on paper, but this time by using thin fine silver, it is pale, soft, and gets scratched easily. Youzhi traces her landscapes on the fine silver, as she would have on paper. 
. She uses only a few structured lines to define nature scenes and folds these drawings into wearable brooches. 
. While wearing the brooches, you cannot evade scratching the surface. These scratches will be part of the natural mistake as there are no rules of how the tree grows and how the mountains are laying one behind another. 
. The first scratches break your heart because they feel like a mistake after it is them that allow the viewer to trace a story. Through wearing the pieces, they evoke further storytelling by their daily contact with the body. . Youzhi Bi
Brooch: Landscape, 2019
Fine silver, stainless steel wire.
60 x 1 x 7 cm
From series: Trace

Youzhi Bi (b.1995, China) is a master student of the Jewellery Design, Gold & Silversmithing department at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp. Before this, she obtained a Bachelor degree from Sheffield Hallam University in 2016. 
One of the most exciting moments of her art making is to be encountered with a blank sheet of paper ready to be transformed. Worrying about making it dirty, Youzhi always tries to control the lines of her drawings to be sharp and accurate. 
However, no paper can stay clean, and no drawing can be perfect. 
What is believed to be a mistake is actually what makes a drawing a personal distinctive piece of art. 
She found a way to keep that sensation of drawing on paper, but this time by using thin fine silver, it is pale, soft, and gets scratched easily. Youzhi traces her landscapes on the fine silver, as she would have on paper. 
She uses only a few structured lines to define nature scenes and folds these drawings into wearable brooches. 
While wearing the brooches, you cannot evade scratching the surface. These scratches will be part of the natural mistake as there are no rules of how the tree grows and how the mountains are laying one behind another. 
The first scratches break your heart because they feel like a mistake after it is them that allow the viewer to trace a story. Through wearing the pieces, they evoke further storytelling by their daily contact with the body. 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Vie Stessens. Piece: Fork & Fly, 2019. Silver, plastic, horn, other metal.. 10 x 0.5 x 16 cm. Photo by: Tina Herbots. From series: From survival to revival. Hair clip.
. 
. Vie Stessens (b. 1994, Belguim) is currently a master student at the Jewellery Design, Gold & Silversmithing Department at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp.   
. We all often keep some jewellery that we don’t wear anymore because we have a feeling or memory attached to it. It ends up in a box deeply hidden in a cabinet or drawer. More and more jewellery just lies there with no particular reason or the potential to be worn in the near future.  
. The industry keeps on producing and we keep on buying every season. But what happens with all this jewellery we don’t wear anymore? 
. Vie wants to tackle this problem in her work. She is as well a collector of these hidden away treasures and sees value and possibilities in them.   
. The unexpected unique combinations are the starting point of her process and stand central in her way of working. With the forgotten jewellery she creates new, transformed and wearable pieces. She rediscovers the jewellery through making new combinations and the way she assembles them together she creates new unique pieces ready to wear again.  
. Vie’s intuitive way of combining and assembling makes her pieces appealing and if you look well there is a touch of wittiness.  
. In her way of working she merges humor, creativity and metalwork skills.  Her collection, ‘From survival to revival’, breathes new life into the old, hidden pieces. . Vie Stessens
Piece: Fork & Fly, 2019
Silver, plastic, horn, other metal.
10 x 0.5 x 16 cm
Photo by: Tina Herbots
From series: From survival to revival
Hair clip.

Vie Stessens (b. 1994, Belguim) is currently a master student at the Jewellery Design, Gold & Silversmithing Department at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp.   
We all often keep some jewellery that we don’t wear anymore because we have a feeling or memory attached to it. It ends up in a box deeply hidden in a cabinet or drawer. More and more jewellery just lies there with no particular reason or the potential to be worn in the near future.  
The industry keeps on producing and we keep on buying every season. But what happens with all this jewellery we don’t wear anymore? 
Vie wants to tackle this problem in her work. She is as well a collector of these hidden away treasures and sees value and possibilities in them.   
The unexpected unique combinations are the starting point of her process and stand central in her way of working. With the forgotten jewellery she creates new, transformed and wearable pieces. She rediscovers the jewellery through making new combinations and the way she assembles them together she creates new unique pieces ready to wear again.  
Vie’s intuitive way of combining and assembling makes her pieces appealing and if you look well there is a touch of wittiness.  
In her way of working she merges humor, creativity and metalwork skills.  Her collection, ‘From survival to revival’, breathes new life into the old, hidden pieces. 

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Lera Treyger. Bracelet: The recollections, 2019. Silver, glass.. 18 x 1 x 1 cm. From series: The recollections. 
. Lera Treyger is currently finishing her Master degree in Jewellery Design, Gold and Silversmithing at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp. 
. `The recollections` project is focused on jewellery, that has a strong meaning to people as they received it from loved ones.  Even so, they do not feel any desire to wearing it. There are different reasons why: such as a completely different taste, size or even another religious belief. Still, people want to preserve the emotional connection with the person, and they are storing these presents in their drawers.  But are these memories alive if jewellery is hidden in boxes and are not worn anymore?  
. Lera collects these jewellery, interviews the owners and reflects on their stories. She develops her personal approach to each person by combining their aesthetics and memories into new wearable jewellery with no intervention on the original one.    As Lera wants to save the visual connection between a piece of jewellery and a wearer she chose transparent glass as one of the main tools in her project. 
. Through working with a glass artist, Lera combines borosilicate glass and precious metals with the old pieces of jewellery. By changing the way of wearing them, masking, hiding or contrariwise magnifying and emphasising the original pieces she creates a new contemporary design. 
. Finally, new wearable jewellery returns to the owner, but this time the memory comes out of the box.. Lera Treyger
Bracelet: The recollections, 2019
Silver, glass.
18 x 1 x 1 cm
From series: The recollections

Lera Treyger is currently finishing her Master degree in Jewellery Design, Gold and Silversmithing at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp. 
`The recollections` project is focused on jewellery, that has a strong meaning to people as they received it from loved ones.  Even so, they do not feel any desire to wearing it. There are different reasons why: such as a completely different taste, size or even another religious belief. Still, people want to preserve the emotional connection with the person, and they are storing these presents in their drawers.  But are these memories alive if jewellery is hidden in boxes and are not worn anymore?  
Lera collects these jewellery, interviews the owners and reflects on their stories. She develops her personal approach to each person by combining their aesthetics and memories into new wearable jewellery with no intervention on the original one.    As Lera wants to save the visual connection between a piece of jewellery and a wearer she chose transparent glass as one of the main tools in her project. 
Through working with a glass artist, Lera combines borosilicate glass and precious metals with the old pieces of jewellery. By changing the way of wearing them, masking, hiding or contrariwise magnifying and emphasising the original pieces she creates a new contemporary design. 
Finally, new wearable jewellery returns to the owner, but this time the memory comes out of the box.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Sophia de Groot. Earcuff: Interlinked, 2019. 3D printed stainless steel.. Photo by: Casper Fitzhue. From series: Interlinked. 
. Sophia de Groot (b. 1993, Netherlands) is a Masters student of the Jewellery Design, Gold and Silversmithing Department at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp.  
. In her research, Sophia is exploring movement within the limitation of one material and it’s possibilities within one autonomous piece. She is searching for a way to create fluidity in one continuous shape. One form of jewellery that embodies these properties is chain. 
. In her work she considers the links of a chain and the way they are connected as an item into itself and not just as a support for other jewellery; the chain and it’s a repetitive connection as the main subject in her jewellery pieces.  
. Sophia is a digital craftsman who unites technology, craftsmanship and art. She crosses with her designs in multiple disciplines. By making 3D printed stainless steel links and assembling them in a repetitive way by the hand she makes unique combinations of chain pieces.  
. Because of her research, she was on- and offline in connection with different people around the world who all contributed in some way in her work. The beauty in the digital world is that everyone is linked and want to help in making solutions for the problems you’re facing. Everyone elements connected, like a chain.  
. We are all linked.  
. One by one.  
. Moving on our own. 
. Very tight or loosely. 
. But interlinked together.. Sophia de Groot
Earcuff: Interlinked, 2019
3D printed stainless steel.
Photo by: Casper Fitzhue
From series: Interlinked

Sophia de Groot (b. 1993, Netherlands) is a Masters student of the Jewellery Design, Gold and Silversmithing Department at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp.  
In her research, Sophia is exploring movement within the limitation of one material and it’s possibilities within one autonomous piece. She is searching for a way to create fluidity in one continuous shape. One form of jewellery that embodies these properties is chain. 
In her work she considers the links of a chain and the way they are connected as an item into itself and not just as a support for other jewellery; the chain and it’s a repetitive connection as the main subject in her jewellery pieces.  
Sophia is a digital craftsman who unites technology, craftsmanship and art. She crosses with her designs in multiple disciplines. By making 3D printed stainless steel links and assembling them in a repetitive way by the hand she makes unique combinations of chain pieces.  
Because of her research, she was on- and offline in connection with different people around the world who all contributed in some way in her work. The beauty in the digital world is that everyone is linked and want to help in making solutions for the problems you’re facing. Everyone elements connected, like a chain.  
We are all linked.  
One by one.  
Moving on our own. 
Very tight or loosely. 
But interlinked together.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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