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Sheffield Institute of Arts, Degree Show 2018

Exhibition  /  SchoolsDegreeShow2018  /  09 Jun 2018  -  22 Jun 2018
Published: 28.05.2018
Andrei Jakab. Brooch: Element of Surprise, 2018. Porcelain, foil balloon.. 12 x 4 x 10 cm. Photo by: Andrei Jakab. 
. Many people take great comfort in discovering hidden treasures in case within pouches and containers. My collection of objects represent the set of curated mysteries that act as talismans of self control. My pieces could also be seen as a paradox of temptation due to the suggestive shapes reminiscent of inflated bags. When buying trading cards or Kinder eggs, the feeling of reward resides in the split second of opening the packaging and thus solving the mystery. Through my work I used the timeless nature of porcelain and combine it with the tempting aspect of inflated foil pouches, to create a luxury mystery bag. Is the feeling of instant gratification worth more than the regret followed by destroying the piece?. Andrei Jakab
Brooch: Element of Surprise, 2018
Porcelain, foil balloon.
12 x 4 x 10 cm
Photo by: Andrei Jakab

Many people take great comfort in discovering hidden treasures in case within pouches and containers. My collection of objects represent the set of curated mysteries that act as talismans of self control. My pieces could also be seen as a paradox of temptation due to the suggestive shapes reminiscent of inflated bags. When buying trading cards or Kinder eggs, the feeling of reward resides in the split second of opening the packaging and thus solving the mystery. Through my work I used the timeless nature of porcelain and combine it with the tempting aspect of inflated foil pouches, to create a luxury mystery bag. Is the feeling of instant gratification worth more than the regret followed by destroying the piece?
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
The BA Jewellery and Metalwork Degree at Sheffield Hallam University is designed to give students a tailored education in Jewellery and Metalwork Design and Creative Practice. The aim of the programme is to give students a hands-on interaction with materials and processes, where they can identify and solve design problems through the production of carefully resolved objects.
 
Situated within Sheffield Institute of Arts; the course benefits from sitting within and alongside specialist workshops and practice studios from a range of art and design disciplines.
 
Students respond in their own personal way. Each student brings their individual cultural experiences into their work and the result is a fascinating selection of viewpoints and perspectives on making.
 
We are excited to share their outcomes with you and hope you enjoy the results of their hard work as much as we have enjoyed supporting their journeys.

Guiding Lecturers: Jenny Hutton, Alison Counsell, Rachael Colley, Chris Knight, Jeff Durber, Grace Horne, Cóilín Ó Dubhghaill.


Artist list:
Lois Fletcher, Amelia Gadie, Oliver Hunt, Iu Yue Ka, Andrei Jakab, Mingyi Jiang, Rongda Li, Hanyao Lin, Paige Newall, Pin Tak Yin, Baihan Wang, Haiyin Wang, Shuyu Yan, Yilin Zhang, Zhuojun Zhang, Yuanliei Zhao, Meng Zhou, Yue Chen, Yingting Huang, Ming Fei Jia, Ai Ma, Zhuorui Sun, Emily Taylor, Fengming Xue.


Venues:
-
Sheffield Institute Of Arts Degree Show: 9-22 June 2018
Head Post Office, Fitzalan Square, Sheffield, S1 2AY

- New Designers: 27 June- 2 July 2018
Business Design Centre 52 Upper Street London N1 0QH.
https://www.newdesigners.com/exhibitors/sheffield-hallam-university-2/
 
Hanyao Lin. Brooch: Wrinkles, 2018. Sterling silver, 9ct gold and elastic.. 7 x 0.8 x 7 cm. Photo by: Hanyao Lin. 
. In my observation, people’s demandof jewellery is not only as a decoration, but also as a language to express personality. It’s my aim to make wearers feel like their true selves while wearing the objects. I made these brooches that help people frame their identity, while complementing their clothing and thus contouring their personal taste. By wearing the brooch, the wrinkles around the object can magnify your character. Interacting with your brooch by assembling and pinning it onto the clothing becomes a ritual in its own self. The use of the hair bands references how these everyday objects become a piece of jewellery; hair bands already having the potential of jewellery by adorning our hair and wrists. In the process of assembling, wearers feel playful, stretching the variety of colours of elastic bands onto the blank silver frame.
.  . Hanyao Lin
Brooch: Wrinkles, 2018
Sterling silver, 9ct gold and elastic.
7 x 0.8 x 7 cm
Photo by: Hanyao Lin

In my observation, people’s demandof jewellery is not only as a decoration, but also as a language to express personality. It’s my aim to make wearers feel like their true selves while wearing the objects. I made these brooches that help people frame their identity, while complementing their clothing and thus contouring their personal taste. By wearing the brooch, the wrinkles around the object can magnify your character. Interacting with your brooch by assembling and pinning it onto the clothing becomes a ritual in its own self. The use of the hair bands references how these everyday objects become a piece of jewellery; hair bands already having the potential of jewellery by adorning our hair and wrists. In the process of assembling, wearers feel playful, stretching the variety of colours of elastic bands onto the blank silver frame.
 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Paige Newall. Brooch: Saltwick Bay, 2018. Sterling silver, ammonite, stainless steel.. 8 x 2 x 7 cm. Photo by: Paige Newall. 
. Influenced by the sea and the effect it has on objects, most of the objects I use have been found along the shores of Whitby through beach combing. I find myself drawn to this place, behind its dull rainy exterior lies pops of colour, bustling narrow streets and treasures in hidden nooks and crannies. I have incorporated Ammonite and Belemnite fossils alongside silver, using this precious material to fix and transform these fragile objects. This work examines the relationship between found and created objects and recreating the idea behind these found objects by incorporating new material. Within my work, I view the found objects as a precious material also and through the deconstruction and reconstruction of these items it allows me to transform them into new interesting pieces. Things I find become sentimental to me through experience and memory and transforming them into something then wearable I feel is important as a maker so these precious items we find don’t just sit around collecting dust but can be worn and shared stories through.. Paige Newall
Brooch: Saltwick Bay, 2018
Sterling silver, ammonite, stainless steel.
8 x 2 x 7 cm
Photo by: Paige Newall

Influenced by the sea and the effect it has on objects, most of the objects I use have been found along the shores of Whitby through beach combing. I find myself drawn to this place, behind its dull rainy exterior lies pops of colour, bustling narrow streets and treasures in hidden nooks and crannies. I have incorporated Ammonite and Belemnite fossils alongside silver, using this precious material to fix and transform these fragile objects. This work examines the relationship between found and created objects and recreating the idea behind these found objects by incorporating new material. Within my work, I view the found objects as a precious material also and through the deconstruction and reconstruction of these items it allows me to transform them into new interesting pieces. Things I find become sentimental to me through experience and memory and transforming them into something then wearable I feel is important as a maker so these precious items we find don’t just sit around collecting dust but can be worn and shared stories through.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Helena Rusell. Vessel: The Multisensory Drinking Experience, 2018. Sterling silver, ceramics, wood.. 30 x 14 x 30 cm. Photo by: Helena Rusell. 
. The Multisensory Drinking Experience: Enhancing the senses through a combination of craft practices.
. One of the most common rituals we encounter in everyday life is sitting down and having a drink, whether that is a warming, huggable cup of coffee at the beginning of your day or going out for social drinks with friends after a long day at work, we all know that satisfying ‘ahhhh’ after we take the first sip. But is this ritual becoming rushed and forgotten about through takeaway cups and ‘session’ drinking? When was the last time you sat back and appreciated your drink, with all your senses?
. Each of these vessels has their own character and aim to enhance different senses, through their form, texture, sizeand finish. Some are shaped to increase the aromas, some to consider where the vessel ‘should’ be drank from and others tactile finishes caused during the making process intrigue the user to caress each mark left from hammer blows in the silver vessels or the considered indents in the ceramic vessels.. Helena Rusell
Vessel: The Multisensory Drinking Experience, 2018
Sterling silver, ceramics, wood.
30 x 14 x 30 cm
Photo by: Helena Rusell

The Multisensory Drinking Experience: Enhancing the senses through a combination of craft practices.
One of the most common rituals we encounter in everyday life is sitting down and having a drink, whether that is a warming, huggable cup of coffee at the beginning of your day or going out for social drinks with friends after a long day at work, we all know that satisfying ‘
ahhhh’ after we take the first sip. But is this ritual becoming rushed and forgotten about through takeaway cups and ‘session’ drinking? When was the last time you sat back and appreciated your drink, with all your senses?
Each of these vessels has their own character and aim to enhance different senses, through their form, texture,
sizeand finish. Some are shaped to increase the aromas, some to consider where the vessel ‘should’ be drank from and others tactile finishes caused during the making process intrigue the user to caress each mark left from hammer blows in the silver vessels or the considered indents in the ceramic vessels.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Baihan Wang. Neckpiece: Seeing Red, 2018. Hair removal wax, silk, ceramic.. 40 x 20 x 50 cm. Photo by: Baihan Wang. 
. I am interested in exploring gender through my work. The red cotton represent blood. The silicon tube represents breast ducts, and the lobes are made from hair removal wax. These body pieces are gender neutral. The internal structure of the breast is complex, and the lobes are the distinction between male and female breast.. Baihan Wang
Neckpiece: Seeing Red, 2018
Hair removal wax, silk, ceramic.
40 x 20 x 50 cm
Photo by: Baihan Wang

I am interested in exploring gender through my work. The red cotton represent blood. The silicon tube represents breast ducts, and the lobes are made from hair removal wax. These body pieces are gender neutral. The internal structure of the breast is complex, and the lobes are the distinction between male and female breast.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Haiyin Wang. Bracelet: Relationship: Lovers 2, 2018. Silver plated brass, bamboo.. Photo by: Hiyin Wang. From series: Strangers. Friends. Best friends. Lovers. Strangers. 
. Bamboo is stronger than steel. It builds its strength as it matures. In many parts of the
. Strangers. Friends. Best friends. Lovers. Strangers. it is used as scaffolding. Young bamboo is fragile as it can easily shatter. These worldjewellery objects make comment on the contrasting experiences within a relationship. Negative aspects of love can build or shatter a relationship. My jewellery collection uses young bamboo and metal junctions to construct wearable pieces that allow us to question what makes a solid and healthy relationship.
.  . Haiyin Wang
Bracelet: Relationship: Lovers 2, 2018
Silver plated brass, bamboo.
Photo by: Hiyin Wang
From series: Strangers. Friends. Best friends. Lovers. Strangers

Bamboo is stronger than steel. It builds its strength as it matures. In many parts of the
Strangers. Friends. Best friends. Lovers. Strangers.
it is used as scaffolding. Young bamboo is fragile as it can easily shatter. These world
jewellery objects make comment on the contrasting experiences within a relationship. Negative aspects of love can build or shatter a relationship. My jewellery collection uses young bamboo and metal junctions to construct wearable pieces that allow us to question what makes a solid and healthy relationship.
 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Yilin Zhang. Set: Balance & Swing, 2018. Sterling silver.. Photo by: Yilin Zhang. 
. I really like the feeling of flexibility created by curves and surfaces, and the jewels that is kinetic. I think jewellery is both a part of the body and an extension of the body. I prefer to see the body as a canvas, and jewellery is the crowning touch of the body. I am very much focused on the research and study of technology, not only on the handmade aspect but also on new technologies such as CAD and 3D printing technology, as well as material research. I think that design and technology are inseparable. Technology constantly challenges my graphic imagination and allows me to imagine more shapes and forms. At the same time, I don't think that designers and craftsmen should indulge in what is the difference between handmade and non-handmade. All this is based on our mind's ability to imagine forms and shapes. Of course, while jewellery should be beautiful and practical, jewellery should also be used as a container to carry meaning and history. This is what I think of the designer's mission and the significance of jewellery. Integrating meaning, functionality, appearance, and technology, combining tradition with modernity, and combining Chinese and Western cultures are my primary focus as a Chinese designer.. Yilin Zhang
Set: Balance & Swing, 2018
Sterling silver.
Photo by: Yilin Zhang

I really like the feeling of flexibility created by curves and surfaces, and the jewels that is kinetic. I think jewellery is both a part of the body and an extension of the body. I prefer to see the body as a canvas, and jewellery is the crowning touch of the body. I am very much focused on the research and study of technology, not only on the handmade aspect but also on new technologies such as CAD and 3D printing technology, as well as material research. I think that design and technology are inseparable. Technology constantly challenges my graphic imagination and allows me to imagine more shapes and forms. At the same time, I don't think that designers and craftsmen should indulge in what is the difference between handmade and non-handmade. All this is based on our mind's ability to imagine forms and shapes. Of course, while jewellery should be beautiful and practical, jewellery should also be used as a container to carry meaning and history. This is what I think of the designer's mission and the significance of jewellery. Integrating meaning, functionality, appearance, and technology, combining tradition with modernity, and combining Chinese and Western cultures are my primary focus as a Chinese designer.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Meng Zhou. Object: The Inability to Cry, 2018. Silver, stainless steel, acrylic mirror.. 14 x 6 x 16 cm. Photo by: Meng Zhou. 
. For this collection, I have created a series of glasses but not in the traditional sense. These works are based on the experience of dry eye disease; I want to show the feeling of dry eye from both a physical and a mental perspective. As the designer, I’m suffer from dry eye disease. I have a personal understanding of the feeling of dry eye, it bothers me every day. Sometimes everything is fuzzy in sight, sometimes my eyes are red, I have a fear of strong light, as my eyes are sensitive, I feel like I want to cry, but the interesting thing is that there is no tears. Try these on. Feel as I do. Do you feel lucky that you are healthy?. Meng Zhou
Object: The Inability to Cry, 2018
Silver, stainless steel, acrylic mirror.
14 x 6 x 16 cm
Photo by: Meng Zhou

For this collection, I have created a series of glasses but not in the traditional sense. These works are based on the experience of dry eye disease; I want to show the feeling of dry eye from both a physical and a mental perspective. As the designer, I’m suffer from dry eye disease. I have a personal understanding of the feeling of dry eye, it bothers me every day. Sometimes everything is fuzzy in sight, sometimes my eyes are red, I have a fear of strong light, as my eyes are sensitive, I feel like I want to cry, but the interesting thing is that there is no tears. Try these on. Feel as I do. Do you feel lucky that you are healthy?
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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