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Transform

Exhibition  /  03 Feb 2008  -  02 Apr 2008
Published: 26.03.2008
Anders Ljungberg. Object: Into, 2007. Silver, zinc. 14 x 9 x 17 cm. 
. A jug, by its very nature, acts generously. It gives. 
. This jug is formed to accept; allowing itself to be filled, not by another's gift, 
. but by the room's empty space pouring into its inner void.. Anders Ljungberg
Object: Into, 2007
Silver, zinc
14 x 9 x 17 cm

A jug, by its very nature, acts generously. It gives. 
This jug is formed to accept; allowing itself to be filled, not by another's gift, 
but by the room's empty space pouring into its inner void.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
My exhibition focuses upon objects of everyday use and their significance for us in our interactions with, and as users of them.

Artist list

Anders Ljungberg
Transform

My exhibition focuses upon objects of everyday use and their significance for us in our interactions with, and as users of them. These objects can also be read as a portrait of something human; the vessel itself representing the body, while the choice of materials and forms are the existential commentary to the vessel.

Anders Ljungberg. Object: Centaur, 2007. Silver, lacquered Cibatool resin. 33 x 31 x 21 cm. 
. Because of the functionalism movement of the 1900s, function as a concept, has until present, nearly always been about the practical aspects of an object. This is in contrast to the Baroque period, when emphasis was placed upon an object’s social function. This was particularly true for silver objects. 
. 
. In this piece, two objects have become one. Together, they must completely depend upon one another in order to stand, and to be that which it is intended for them individually to be – table and bowl. Social and practical function.. Anders Ljungberg
Object: Centaur, 2007
Silver, lacquered Cibatool resin
33 x 31 x 21 cm

Because of the functionalism movement of the 1900s, function as a concept, has until present, nearly always been about the practical aspects of an object. This is in contrast to the Baroque period, when emphasis was placed upon an object’s social function. This was particularly true for silver objects.

In this piece, two objects have become one. Together, they must completely depend upon one another in order to stand, and to be that which it is intended for them individually to be – table and bowl. Social and practical function.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Anders Ljungberg. Object: Just before after, 2007. Silver, mirror glass, stainless steel. 38 x 28 x 25 cm. 
. This object shifts the direction and alters the time continuum that an object in use illustrates in a room. 
. The goblet falls down against a mirror – one that resembles a pool of spilled water. Here the pool offers the viewer an expectation of a future event. As such, the mirror reflects, in a symbolic sense, something which has already occurred. This piece simultaneously exists in parallel points of time. . Anders Ljungberg
Object: Just before after, 2007
Silver, mirror glass, stainless steel
38 x 28 x 25 cm

This object shifts the direction and alters the time continuum that an object in use illustrates in a room.
The goblet falls down against a mirror – one that resembles a pool of spilled water. Here the pool offers the viewer an expectation of a future event. As such, the mirror reflects, in a symbolic sense, something which has already occurred. This piece simultaneously exists in parallel points of time.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Anders Ljungberg. Object: Trans form 1, 2007. Silver, pitch. 27 x 13 x 20 cm. 
. Pitch is a material and tool, that in the silversmithing tradition, is used to form and decorate a surface. 
. It stands for change. 
. In this piece, pitch has been used to form a vessel to resemble a speech or thought bubble. It then runs out of the bottom of the vessel and fills the rectangular box beneath. This pitch poses a threat to the rectangular box, as it has the power and potential to change and transform.. Anders Ljungberg
Object: Trans form 1, 2007
Silver, pitch
27 x 13 x 20 cm

Pitch is a material and tool, that in the silversmithing tradition, is used to form and decorate a surface.
It stands for change.
In this piece, pitch has been used to form a vessel to resemble a speech or thought bubble. It then runs out of the bottom of the vessel and fills the rectangular box beneath. This pitch poses a threat to the rectangular box, as it has the power and potential to change and transform.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Anders Ljungberg. Object: Trans form 2, 2007. Silver, oil burnt steel. 26 x 19 x 16 cm. 
. The contents of this bowl has overflowed onto the table's surface and become both the bowl’s shadow and its foundation. The complete emptying, has also become a condition.. Anders Ljungberg
Object: Trans form 2, 2007
Silver, oil burnt steel
26 x 19 x 16 cm

The contents of this bowl has overflowed onto the table's surface and become both the bowl’s shadow and its foundation. The complete emptying, has also become a condition.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Anders Ljungberg. Object: Beneath, 2007. Silver, enamelled copper, oil burnt steel. 22 x 10 x 28 cm. 
. When a jug is poured, a direction is illustrated within the room. The stream created in the act of pouring, also depicts an inner room – one that we cannot always see, but which is clearly made present to us. The liquid is an integral part of a transformation process between the inner room and the outer room. 
. In this jug, the liquid is enclosed within the form that hangs under the steel table. That, in turn, is conjoined with an enamel cup that rests upon the table's surface. The form beneath is the jug's well, and the cup above is a conduit through which the liquid flows out, as opposed to a container in which liquid can flow into. 
. 
. This displacement of what an object represents gives new metaphorical meanings to the different sections of the jug. . Anders Ljungberg
Object: Beneath, 2007
Silver, enamelled copper, oil burnt steel
22 x 10 x 28 cm

When a jug is poured, a direction is illustrated within the room. The stream created in the act of pouring, also depicts an inner room – one that we cannot always see, but which is clearly made present to us. The liquid is an integral part of a transformation process between the inner room and the outer room.
In this jug, the liquid is enclosed within the form that hangs under the steel table. That, in turn, is conjoined with an enamel cup that rests upon the table's surface. The form beneath is the jug's well, and the cup above is a conduit through which the liquid flows out, as opposed to a container in which liquid can flow into.

This displacement of what an object represents gives new metaphorical meanings to the different sections of the jug.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Anders Ljungberg. Object: Me and I (Narcissus), 2007. Silver, porcelain. 20 x 17 x 28 cm. 
. This is a mental biotope. The bowl rests, in wait of being filled. A cloud hovers above; containing what is needed to fulfill the bowl. 
. This is a self-reflecting piece that speaks about who you are, and who you become. Based on images, through their portrayal and the expectations they manifest, your identity is created. In this constant self-reflecting state, the object becomes trapped within itself, without the possibility of release.. Anders Ljungberg
Object: Me and I (Narcissus), 2007
Silver, porcelain
20 x 17 x 28 cm

This is a mental biotope. The bowl rests, in wait of being filled. A cloud hovers above; containing what is needed to fulfill the bowl.
This is a self-reflecting piece that speaks about who you are, and who you become. Based on images, through their portrayal and the expectations they manifest, your identity is created. In this constant self-reflecting state, the object becomes trapped within itself, without the possibility of release.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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