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Goldmuseum Taipei - Metal Crafts Competition 2018.
Goldschmitte.

True is what has been made

Exhibition  /  07 Oct 2017  -  28 Oct 2017
Published: 27.09.2017
Nahuel Federico Nuñez. Brooch: Untitled, 2017. Silver and Quebracho wood. Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano. 
. I began to observe the workers travelling in the train. Workers use their body and tools for their everyday job. Ithank the tools, which along with a specific knowledge allow us to work.. Nahuel Federico Nuñez
Brooch: Untitled, 2017
Silver and Quebracho wood
Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano

I began to observe the workers travelling in the train. Workers use their body and tools for their everyday job. Ithank the tools, which along with a specific knowledge allow us to work.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Jimena Rios and Iris Eichenberg paths have crossed and become entwined through their common interest in ex-votos. Meanwhile, Jimena Rios encounters with 24 artists from Argentina, Colombia and Chile, who are inspired by the power behind ex-voto, the process as intermediaries between a divinity and a devotee and to materialize the latter’s gratitude. She curated an exhibition as a return for the "new ex-votos", pieces created by artists are made and share in a contemporary way. On the other side, under the same theme, work by Iris Eichenberg is also on show: I Do Not Wish by Iris Eichenberg

Artist list

Rodrigo Acosta Arias, Tatiana Apraez, Rita Bamidele Hampton, Victoria Baquero, Flora Caligiuri, Jorge Castañón, Lourdes Chicco Ruiz, Dalia Drajnudel, Paula Gallardo, Paula Giménez Marques, Laura Gorbatt, Carolina Hornauer, Enrique Jaramillo, Monqiue Lecouna, Laura Licandro, Carolina Luzardo, Corina Mascotti, Simon Mazuera, Nahuel Federico Núñez, Cecilia Richard, Silvina Romero, Linda Margarita Sanchez, Nicolás Stimolo, Patricia Tewel
After graduating from the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam in 1994, Iris Eichenberg worked as an independent artist, art educator, part-time curator, and co-organizer of art-related events. She began teaching at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in 1996, where she was Head of the Jewelry Department 2000-2007. Since 2006 she has been an Artist in Residence and Head of the Metal-smithing Department at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan, USA. Iris Eichenberg is regularly exhibiting, invited to lecture, act as visiting critic, and holds workshops at various art academies around the world. In her second solo exhibition I Do Not Wish at PLATINA in Stockholm, she will show a body of work made after multiple working trips to South America.
 
Jimena Ríos grew up in Mendoza, Argentina and lives in Buenos Aires. She studied jewelry at the Escola Massana School of Art and Design in Barcelona, Spain and Alchimia Contemporary Jewelry School in Florence, Italy. She furthered her education attending workshops by well-known artists and so she met Iris Eichenberg. In 2013 she founded Taller Eloi in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to teach and organize workshops. She has given lectures about contemporary jewelry history and seminars on narrative jewelry in Argentina and abroad. Now she comes to Stockholm as a curator for the exhibition True Is What Has Been with works from 24 jewelry artists from Argentina, Colombia and Chile.


Iris Eichenberg and Jimena Rios paths have crossed and become entwined through their common interest in ex-votos: objects which convey a desire or longing and are made out of necessity. Ex-votos are tokens made to express gratitude for a favor granted by a supernatural force. In the midst of misfortune, such as an accident or illness, someone that is unable to resolve things through worldly means pleads for divine intervention with the help of a maker/practitioner. Ex-votos are mementoes and artefacts of that mediation between two worlds. They are often placed in churches or chapels by the worshiper either seeking grace or to give thanks.

As a curator of contemporary jewelry, Jimena Rios explains:
Behind a traditional ex-voto, there is a votary pleading to a divinity, a granted favor, and, as a token of gratitude, a silversmith making an object, offered in turn to the saint who worked the miracle. The jewelers who took part in this project were inspired by this process as intermediaries between a divinity and a devotee and to materialize the latter’s gratitude. In this case, the “new ex-votos” are made in a contemporary way and will not be placed in a church, nor were they made to return a favor from a saint, but they share that intention.
Contemporary jewelry can be regarded as a medium to start a dialogue. Just like with ex-votos, the dialogue
concerning the pieces in this exhibition starts with someone expressing their gratitude. It is the yearning behind this materiality that makes ex-votos rich objects, both in its contemporary and traditional forms. Symbolic power is the link between these two worlds.

Coming from the Protestant part of Europe, and currently residing in the United States, Iris Eichenberg describes herself as a visitor of that Catholic tradition and comments on this joint exhibition:
As a traveler I shop and I am taking, but I do not want to run with the message and leave the real messenger behind. Thus the exhibition took this form. There is an archetype among objects, those which transmit through their making and use, and it is an essential part of jewelry. Ex-votos possess a unique ability to communicate because they stand-in for universal longing for change and betterment. Gratitude and love are hard to convey, and I have real admiration for these objects which are made out of necessity and charged through making.

Opening

Saturday 7th of October, 15h -17h
Tatiana Apraez. Brooch: Comunion I-II, 2017. Hand carved wood, mopa mopa resin and silver.. Photo by: Tatiana Apraez.  
. I use the technique Barniz de Pasto in my work because is a sum of my identity; in it coexist my two cultural roots: the pre-Hispanic technique of waterproofing the wood by using the resin Mopa-mopa and Spanish graphic motifs.  These graphics blend with the indigenous motifs creating a new language to communicate with the mestizo, with us. As if the latex were a blank sheet to talk about of the union of two worlds present until today. I appreciate this moment of creation, offering jewelry to create a union, and communion among all. To unite through art, using technologies from different origins that make us stronger at the moment of creation.  Accepting our indigenous past and at the same time accepting the changes it has had and will continue to have, is accepting what we are and what we will be.  Besides, to observe that our value is precisely in this heterogeneous mixture and is to achieve peace and share it.. Tatiana Apraez
Brooch: Comunion I-II, 2017
Hand carved wood, mopa mopa resin and silver.
Photo by: Tatiana Apraez
 
I use the technique Barniz de Pasto in my work because is a sum of my identity; in it coexist my two cultural roots: the pre-Hispanic technique of waterproofing the wood by using the resin Mopa-mopa and Spanish graphic motifs.  These graphics blend with the indigenous motifs creating a new language to communicate with the mestizo, with us. As if the latex were a blank sheet to talk about of the union of two worlds present until today. I appreciate this moment of creation, offering jewelry to create a union, and communion among all. To unite through art, using technologies from different origins that make us stronger at the moment of creation.  Accepting our indigenous past and at the same time accepting the changes it has had and will continue to have, is accepting what we are and what we will be.  Besides, to observe that our value is precisely in this heterogeneous mixture and is to achieve peace and share it.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Rita Bamidele Hampton. Brooch: Liquid and Solid, 2017. Oxidized sterling silver.. Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano. 
. Fluids make us grow and duplicate; they foster life in all its forms. I am thankful to liquid for flowing through the solid. I am thankful to nature for showing me my body’s wonder: breastfeeding; through my own self and my liquids, a different body grows with its own liquids. Chiseling has the ability to bring, through the hammer your thoughts and feelings onto the metal. The volume created by chiselling imprints each moment onto your work. Breastfeeding takes place moment-by-moment, drop by drop, leaving one body to enter another, flowing.. Rita Bamidele Hampton
Brooch: Liquid and Solid, 2017
Oxidized sterling silver.
Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano

Fluids make us grow and duplicate; they foster life in all its forms. I am thankful to liquid for flowing through the solid. I am thankful to nature for showing me my body’s wonder: breastfeeding; through my own self and my liquids, a different body grows with its own liquids. Chiseling has the ability to bring, through the hammer your thoughts and feelings onto the metal. The volume created by chiselling imprints each moment onto your work. Breastfeeding takes place moment-by-moment, drop by drop, leaving one body to enter another, flowing.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Jorge Castañon. Brooch: She, 2017. Found pieces of wood, paint and silver.. Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano. I constantly felt that it was life itself I wanted to thank for, but as I started putting together the character I had designed in my project, I couldn’t help but think about Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. I felt I was creating a man of sorts and, after recalling the monster’s claim to Victor Frankenstein (to make someone like him for him to love,) I knew I had to create “Her” as well. So I reflected again on what I was being thankful for, and I understood it was love, the nourishment we all need for living.. Jorge Castañon
Brooch: She, 2017
Found pieces of wood, paint and silver.
Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano
I constantly felt that it was life itself I wanted to thank for, but as I started putting together the character I had designed in my project, I couldn’t help but think about Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. I felt I was creating a man of sorts and, after recalling the monster’s claim to Victor Frankenstein (to make someone like him for him to love,) I knew I had to create “Her” as well. So I reflected again on what I was being thankful for, and I understood it was love, the nourishment we all need for living.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Paula Gallardo. Object: Untitled, 2017. Slip casting earthenware, red pepper seeds and cotton thread.. Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano. 
. I am thankful for witnessing my grandmother’s life and for having learned from her by doing and watching. Outside, the orchard and the garden. Inside sewing, knitting and embroidering. Chores that take time, persistence, and dedication. I am thankful for her care and for having learned to nurture.. Paula Gallardo
Object: Untitled, 2017
Slip casting earthenware, red pepper seeds and cotton thread.
Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano

I am thankful for witnessing my grandmother’s life and for having learned from her by doing and watching. Outside, the orchard and the garden. Inside sewing, knitting and embroidering. Chores that take time, persistence, and dedication. I am thankful for her care and for having learned to nurture.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Laura Gorbatt. Shoulder Piece: Feet, 2017. Silver and cloth cushion.. Photo by: Laura Gorbatt. 
. My ex-voto is the feet of my cat, Lima. I adopted her when she was only 1 month old and she came with crooked feet, apparently from birth, which made her hobble. Initially, the ex-voto aimed to express gratitude for the warm and loving sensation her company made me feels. Surprisingly, while she grew up -during the process of creating the ex-voto, her feet started healing. Now, the ex-voto expresses gratitude for her loving company and also for the healing of her feet.
.  . Laura Gorbatt
Shoulder Piece: Feet, 2017
Silver and cloth cushion.
Photo by: Laura Gorbatt

My ex-voto is the feet of my cat, Lima. I adopted her when she was only 1 month old and she came with crooked feet, apparently from birth, which made her hobble. Initially, the ex-voto aimed to express gratitude for the warm and loving sensation her company made me feels. Surprisingly, while she grew up -during the process of creating the ex-voto, her feet started healing. Now, the ex-voto expresses gratitude for her loving company and also for the healing of her feet.
 
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Monqiue Lecouna. Necklace: Reconstruction I, 2017. Fabric, gold plated brass and brass.. Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano. 
. I am thankful for feeling femininely powerful and for having regained the Gift of creation—a treasure I thought lost or even dead. I felt as if I had myself died a little along with it—my soul was degrading like metal corroded by rust.. Monqiue Lecouna
Necklace: Reconstruction I, 2017
Fabric, gold plated brass and brass.
Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano

I am thankful for feeling femininely powerful and for having regained the Gift of creation—a treasure I thought lost or even dead. I felt as if I had myself died a little along with it—my soul was degrading like metal corroded by rust.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Carolina Luzardo. Hand Piece: Hand piece I, 2017. Radal wood and gold-plated brass.. Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano. 
. Everyone in my family connects with the world through our hands. “There is gold in your hands,” my grandmother used to say, celebrating our ability to create, express ourselves, and work with our hands. I think and feel through my hands.
. I built my piece with my father. I wanted to express thanks for being able to do things with my hands by creating an object that could only be understood and seen as it is while held with both hands. Hands are an essential element for us to understand the piece, which overturns when at rest.. Carolina Luzardo
Hand Piece: Hand piece I, 2017
Radal wood and gold-plated brass.
Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano

Everyone in my family connects with the world through our hands. “There is gold in your hands,” my grandmother used to say, celebrating our ability to create, express ourselves, and work with our hands. I think and feel through my hands.
I built my piece with my father. I wanted to express thanks for being able to do things with my hands by creating an object that could only be understood and seen as it is while held with both hands. Hands are an essential element for us to understand the piece, which overturns when at rest.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Silvina Romero. Brooch: Mother and Son, 2017. Fabric, Iron and brass.. Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano. 
. I thank the son, my son who made me a mother. My son who drench me with life infinitely, intensely and lovingly. I Thank the mother-child child-mother love bless. I thank my giving-life existence.. Silvina Romero
Brooch: Mother and Son, 2017
Fabric, Iron and brass.
Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano

I thank the son, my son who made me a mother. My son who drench me with life infinitely, intensely and lovingly. I Thank the mother-child child-mother love bless. I thank my giving-life existence.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Patricia Tewel. Object: Ex votos, 2017. Copper. Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano. 
. I am grateful to the illuminating, trusting, creative fire - the fire that summons gives warmth and transforms. Eager, bright, and compelling. To the lavish, free spark. To the red color of fire that is the heart and living blood. To fire as a ritualistic and symbolic element that brings on the strength of the sun, vital energy to fill each day with eagerness and joy. I thank fire, my fire that celebrates life.. Patricia Tewel
Object: Ex votos, 2017
Copper
Photo by: Marcelo Tarsitano

I am grateful to the illuminating, trusting, creative fire - the fire that summons gives warmth and transforms. Eager, bright, and compelling. To the lavish, free spark. To the red color of fire that is the heart and living blood. To fire as a ritualistic and symbolic element that brings on the strength of the sun, vital energy to fill each day with eagerness and joy. I thank fire, my fire that celebrates life.
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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