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Un peu de terre sur la peau

Exhibition  /  29 Sep 2012  -  24 Mar 2013
Published: 27.09.2012
Un peu de terre sur la peau.
Coda Museum
Management:
Drs. Carin E.M. Reinders
.

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Intro
In collaboration with la Fondation d’entreprise Bernardaud, the CODA museum presents contemporary ceramic jewellery by nineteen international artists in a spectacular fashion at the exhibition Un peu de terre sur la peau. The base material for the over one hundred pieces of jewellery on display at the CODA Museum is clay, without exception.

Artist list

Iris Eichenberg, Gésine Hackenberg, Tiina Rajakallio, Terhi Tolvanen, Carole Deltenre, Marie Pendariès, Peter Hoogeboom, Willemijn de Greef, Rian de Jong, Manon van Kouswijk, Evert Nijland, Ted Noten, Katja Prins, Yasar Aydin, Natalie Luder, Luzia Vogt, Christoph Zellweger, Shu-lin Wu
In collaboration with la Fondation d’entreprise Bernardaud, the CODA museum presents contemporary ceramic jewellery by nineteen international artists in a spectacular fashion at the exhibition Un peu de terre sur la peau. The base material for the over one hundred pieces of jewellery on display at the CODA Museum is clay, without exception.

The jewellery in the Un peu de terre sur la peau exhibition presents a fresh, personal vision on contemporary jewellery design using clay. A number of the pieces refer to elements from art history and traditions connected to jewellery, whilst other pieces re-invent their position and meaning or are derived from material studies. Un peu de terre sur la peau also demonstrates how the artists put old forms of expression into a new perspective.

Throughout history, jewellery has played an important role, not just in indicating social status, but as a personal ornament it speaks volumes about the wearer’s taste and style. Un peu de terre sur la peau demonstrates how bodily ornaments were made from various, assembled or unassembled materials and how their realization also depends on the techniques applied and on the use of symbolism in the local culture.

Clay has a long history as a material used in jewellery making. The Egyptians produced signet rings from patens and the Greek and the Romans gilded terracotta to imitate gold. For centuries afterwards the use of clay in jewellery manufacture was avoided and forgotten. The invention of a fine paste pottery by Josiah Wedgwood in 1773 drastically changed that.

Modern jewellery designers have access to various forms of ceramic materials. A number have a preference to porcelain. Porcelain can be modelled or casted in a mould; either separately or combined with metal, wood or stone. Moreover, it can be manipulated to create a wide variety in colour and texture. Flexible and pure, fragile yet also highly resistant; porcelain can adapt any form if you use the right technique. So, knowledge of the material is an essential factor.

Currently there are a number of outstanding jewellery designers working with clay. Artist and goldsmith Monika Brugger has bought them together for the exhibition Un peu de terre sur la peau at the CODA Museum.

This exhibition was previously shown at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York, the New Taipei City Yingge Ceramics Museum in Taipei and the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. After its presentation at the CODA Museum (until 24 March 2013) Un peu de terre sur la peau will travel on to the Gardiner Museum in Toronto, Canada.
Peter Hoogeboom. Necklace: Spanish Collar, 1995. Ceramic, silver. 63x7x2 cm. Photo by: Henni van Beek
. From the serie : Handle with care. Peter Hoogeboom
Necklace: Spanish Collar, 1995
Ceramic, silver
63x7x2 cm
Photo by: Henni van Beek
From the serie : Handle with care
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Ted Noten. Pendant: Wearable gold 2, 2000. Porcelain, 24kt lustered gold, 18kt gold-plated. big: 46x20.5x2 | middle: 42x14.5x2 | small: 38x15x. Photo by: ATN, Atelier Ted Noten. Ted Noten
Pendant: Wearable gold 2, 2000
Porcelain, 24kt lustered gold, 18kt gold-plated
big: 46x20.5x2 | middle: 42x14.5x2 | small: 38x15x
Photo by: ATN, Atelier Ted Noten
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Shu-lin Wu. Necklace: Mokume, 2008-2009. Porcelain. 1 pearl: Ø5 cm. Photo by: Hsiao-Yin Chao. Shu-lin Wu
Necklace: Mokume, 2008-2009
Porcelain
1 pearl: Ø5 cm
Photo by: Hsiao-Yin Chao
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Evert Nijland. Necklace: Rococo, 2009. Porcelain, linen. ø16 cm. Photo by: Heddo Hartmann. Evert Nijland
Necklace: Rococo, 2009
Porcelain, linen
ø16 cm
Photo by: Heddo Hartmann
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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