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Un peu de terre sur la peau

Exhibition  /  16 Jun 2010  -  16 Oct 2010
Published: 06.05.2010
Fondation d’entreprise Bernardaud
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Intro
Curated by Monica Brugger the exhibition Un peu de terre sur la peau - A Bit of Clay on the Skin - shows contemporary ceramic jewellery by 18 international artists. At the Fondation Bernardaud one hundred fifty compelling ceramic creations will be presented, by artists whose projects offer new perspectives on porcelain.
Un peu de terre sur la peau - A Bit of Clay on the Skin: Contemporary Ceramic Jewellery.

This year the Fondation Bernardaud plans an exhibition around an art form that is not well recognized in France: contemporary jewellery. The exhibit will present one hundred fifty compelling ceramic creations on loan from the various artists. The works revisit ancestral forms of artistic expression as a means of casting them in new perspectives.

The exhibition is curated by Monika Brugger.

Dates and price

Opening hours:
June 16th to October 16th 2010, everyday (including holidays) except sunday
From 9:45 am to 11:15 am and from 1:30 pm à 4:30 pm. 
In october, by appointments 

Admission
Guided tour including the summer exhibit
adults : 4,50€
Group of 10 or more: 4€
Free for children under 12

Remarks

Un peu de terre sur la peau
While traditional jewellery is linked with precious metal craftwork of the applied arts, since the 1970’s contemporary jewellery has become a field of experimentation in new arenas of art, design and artisanal creation. Through the works of the 18 international artists (French, Swiss, German, Finnish, Dutch, Swedish and Taïwanese) we are offered a revitalized and personal vision. Certain pieces in the exhibit reference the history of the arts and traditions associated with jewellery while others totally reinvent their place, significance and materials. 

Jewellery has always played a role as a gauge of social status within a group as well as a means of differentiation or protest of the social order. Jewellery is the singular personal ornament worn against the skin that evokes a connection between human beings and the natural world. As this exhibition will demonstrate, as have others in the history of jewellery, body ornaments can be created with diverse materials and possibilities of assembly depending on the techniques, symbols and prevailing culture at a given time. While the Egyptians produced seal rings from faience, and the Greeks and Romans gilded terra cotta to imitate gold during ancient times, the use of ceramics in the fabrication of jewellery was abandoned and forgotten for centuries. The resurgence of ceramics occurred in 1773 when Joshiah Wedgwood of England invents a fine stoneware paste with strata of colors that perfectly resemble jasper used to produce neoclassic or romantic cameo-like subjects. 

Today it is the Dutch designer Peter Hoogeboom who, since 1994, has distinguished himself through the innovative incorporation of stoneware and porcelain with jewellery. This notable revival led to an admirable initiative by the European Keramiek Work Centre in the Netherlands (EKWC). The EKWC extended artist-inresidency offers to a number of contemporary precious metal-crafters that would allow them to explore the possibilities of incorporating ceramics in the creation of jewellery. Among the array of ceramic materials available today, some artists prefer porcelain when making jewellery. Porcelain can be modeled or cast, used alone or in combination with metal, wood or stone. It can vary in appearance, color and texture. Smooth and pure, fragile yet highly resistant, porcelain adopts any shape on the condition that one is cognizant of the techniques and constraints - particularly the one linked to its significant shrinkage during firing. Still associated in our collective consciousness with tableware or clinical applications as a scientific material, porcelain can today become an object of desire: a catalyst of visual and physical sensations adapting to the conceptual and poetic demands of contemporary jewellery. As evidenced with A Bit on Clay on the Skin.

Monika Brugger, exhibition curator

La Fondation d’entreprise Bernardaud
Reinventing porcelain - this is the idea which in 2003 inspired Michel Bernardaud to establish the Bernardaud Foundation, with the aim of discovering for this amazing, underestimated material, with all its unsuspected qualities and properties, horizons beyond that of pure tableware. By this initiative, the head of the company was expressing his keenness for artists and designers to come and explore the richnesses of porcelain, and reveal to the public eye the spirit and the power of a company which, since 1863, has centered its philosophy around three values – expertise, innovation and creativity. 

The mission of the Bernardaud Foundation, overseen by Helene Huret, rests on three tenets:
- To welcome artists whose projects offer new perspectives on porcelain
- To heighten public awareness about the “wisdom of the hand” or artisan techniques of fabrication
- To host an annual exhibition of contemporary ceramics (i.e. terra cotta, stoneware, faience and porcelain). This summer exhibition has become a not-to-be-missed event that allows one to discover works by artists that are not often displayed in France but yet bear witness to the prolific and global activity with ceramics that the Bernardaud Foundation strives to promote.

Contact

Hélène Huret | Director
phone: +33 (0)1 43 12 52 06 
email: hhuret@bernardaud.fr
Yasar Aydin. Necklace: Let me, 2008. porcelain, silicone. 15x25 cm. Photo by: Yasar Aydin. Yasar Aydin
Necklace: Let me, 2008
porcelain, silicone
15x25 cm
Photo by: Yasar Aydin
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Carole Deltenre. Brooch: Nymphes, 2007-2009. Porcelain, silver. 3 to 10 cm. Photo by: Carole Deltenre. Carole Deltenre
Brooch: Nymphes, 2007-2009
Porcelain, silver
3 to 10 cm
Photo by: Carole Deltenre
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Willemijn de Greef. Necklace: Spakenburg, 2009. stoneware, hemp rope. 69.5x34.5x2.5 cm. Photo by: Frans Kup
. From the serie : Zuiderzeewerken II. Willemijn de Greef
Necklace: Spakenburg, 2009
stoneware, hemp rope
69.5x34.5x2.5 cm
Photo by: Frans Kup
From the serie : Zuiderzeewerken II
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Andi Gut. Ring: Untitled, 1997-2000. Dental ceramique, steel. Photo by: Gedusa Arndt. Andi Gut
Ring: Untitled, 1997-2000
Dental ceramique, steel
Photo by: Gedusa Arndt
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Gésine Hackenberg. Necklace: Kitchen garniture, 2003-2010. Earthware, thread. Photo by: Gésine Hackenberg. Gésine Hackenberg
Necklace: Kitchen garniture, 2003-2010
Earthware, thread
Photo by: Gésine Hackenberg
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Peter Hoogeboom. Necklace: Spanish Collar, 1995. Ceramic, silver. 63x7x2 cm. Photo by: Henni van Beek
. From the serie : Handle with care. Peter Hoogeboom
Necklace: Spanish Collar, 1995
Ceramic, silver
63x7x2 cm
Photo by: Henni van Beek
From the serie : Handle with care
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Rian de Jong. Brooch: Untitled, 2007. Porcelain, copper. 9.5x6x1.5 cm. Photo by: Rian de Jong. Rian de Jong
Brooch: Untitled, 2007
Porcelain, copper
9.5x6x1.5 cm
Photo by: Rian de Jong
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Manon van Kouswijk. Piece: Pearl Grey, 2004. Porcelain, pearls, glass, wood, plastic. Photo by: Uta Eiesnreich. Manon van Kouswijk
Piece: Pearl Grey, 2004
Porcelain, pearls, glass, wood, plastic
Photo by: Uta Eiesnreich
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Natalie Luder. Object: Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Stoneware, brass goldplated, textile, wood. 80x80x30 cm. Natalie, LuderObject: Breakfast at Tiffany’sStoneware, brass goldplated, textile, wood80x80x30 cmPhoto by: Anaïs Bucher. Natalie Luder
Object: Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Stoneware, brass goldplated, textile, wood
80x80x30 cm


Natalie, Luder
Object: Breakfast at Tiffany’s
Stoneware, brass goldplated, textile, wood
80x80x30 cm
Photo by: Anaïs Bucher
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Evert Nijland. Necklace: Rococo, 2009. Porcelain, linen. ø16 cm. Photo by: Heddo Hartmann. Evert Nijland
Necklace: Rococo, 2009
Porcelain, linen
ø16 cm
Photo by: Heddo Hartmann
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Ted Noten. Pendant: Wearable gold 2, 2000. Porcelain, 24kt lustered gold, 18kt gold-plated. big: 46x20.5x2 | middle: 42x14.5x2 | small: 38x15x. Photo by: ATN, Atelier Ted Noten. Ted Noten
Pendant: Wearable gold 2, 2000
Porcelain, 24kt lustered gold, 18kt gold-plated
big: 46x20.5x2 | middle: 42x14.5x2 | small: 38x15x
Photo by: ATN, Atelier Ted Noten
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Marie Pendariès. Installation: La dot, 2008. Photography, 28 porcelain pieces. various dimensions | detail. Photo by: Marie Pendariès. Marie Pendariès
Installation: La dot, 2008
Photography, 28 porcelain pieces
various dimensions | detail
Photo by: Marie Pendariès
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Katja Prins. Brooch: Inventarium, 2002. Silver, porcelain, rubber. 5.3x6.3x5 cm. Photo by: Eddo Hartmann. Katja Prins
Brooch: Inventarium, 2002
Silver, porcelain, rubber
5.3x6.3x5 cm
Photo by: Eddo Hartmann
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Tiina Rajakallio. Necklace: Purity, 2008. Clay, lint, human hair, porcelaine, shellac. 7x7x38 cm. Photo by: Tiina Rajakallio. Tiina Rajakallio
Necklace: Purity, 2008
Clay, lint, human hair, porcelaine, shellac
7x7x38 cm
Photo by: Tiina Rajakallio
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Terhi Tolvanen. Necklace: Zig Zag, 2007. Porcelain, silver. ø18 cm. Photo by: Francis Willemstijn
. From the serie : Woodland. Terhi Tolvanen
Necklace: Zig Zag, 2007
Porcelain, silver
ø18 cm
Photo by: Francis Willemstijn
From the serie : Woodland
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Luzia Vogt. Ring: Flüchtige Momente, since 2006. Porcelain, silver. 3.2 to 4.8 cm high. Photo by: Luzia Vogt. Luzia Vogt
Ring: Flüchtige Momente, since 2006
Porcelain, silver
3.2 to 4.8 cm high
Photo by: Luzia Vogt
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Shu-lin Wu. Necklace: Mokume, 2008-2009. Porcelain. 1 pearl: Ø5 cm. Photo by: Hsiao-Yin Chao. Shu-lin Wu
Necklace: Mokume, 2008-2009
Porcelain
1 pearl: Ø5 cm
Photo by: Hsiao-Yin Chao
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Christoph Zellweger. Object: Seeds, 2001. Porcelain, leather. 27x19x10 cm. Photo by: Corné Bastiaansen. Christoph Zellweger
Object: Seeds, 2001
Porcelain, leather
27x19x10 cm
Photo by: Corné Bastiaansen
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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