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Wittenbrink zeigt Schmuck

Exhibition  /  16 Mar 2012  -  24 Mar 2012
Published: 09.03.2012
WittenbrinkFuenfHoefe
Management:
Christian Hoedl Hanna & Bernhard Wittenbrink
Simon Cottrell. Brooch: Double dumb bang hammer, 2009. Monel, Stainless steel. 7 x 6 x 4 cm. Simon Cottrell
Brooch: Double dumb bang hammer, 2009
Monel, Stainless steel
7 x 6 x 4 cm
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Intro
In the scope of the international "Schmuck" exhibition, we would like to present two excellent artists who stand out among other artists due to their very unique voice as well as a jewelry project “Wittenbrink Charms”, which shows an internationally appreciated jewelry collection of 14 jewelry designers.

Artist list

Mielle Harvey, Simon Cottrell
In the scope of the international "Schmuck" exhibition, we would like to present two excellent artists who stand out among other artists due to their very unique voice as well as a jewelry project “Wittenbrink Charms”, which shows an internationally appreciated jewelry collection of 14 jewelry designers.

Mielle Harvey lives and works in New York. She studied at the Rhode Island School of Design in Provence, USA, and afterwards under Professor Otto Künzli at the Munich Academy of Fine Arts.

She has the ability to transform her drawings into tridimensional masterpieces. With a calm hand, she cuts forms out of soft delicate wax and through
the process of melting in metal she transforms these bodies into visible and discoverable objects.

This is how Mielle Harvey breathes new life into dead and extinct creatures and forms. Delicate bodies of birds, shimmering moths, mushrooms on which
golden wasps are dancing and delicate butterfly wings unite Mielle’s understanding of beauty and the pursuit of something new.

Simon Cottrell lives and works in Melbourne. He studied at the Royal Institute of Technology in Melbourne and was assistant of Professor Robert Baines,
Professor Marjan Hosking.

Simon Cottrell saws his precise, technical-build shapes out of ship steel. Proportional stable pieces transform into light steel gray hollow bodies. They develop such a strong and clear appearance as if they were fallen down from another planet. 

Exhibition curated by Christian Hoedl
Simon Cottrell. Brooch: Double drop (the very first complex simplicity), 1999. Monel, Stainless steel. Simon Cottrell
Brooch: Double drop (the very first complex simplicity), 1999
Monel, Stainless steel
© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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