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Open Call. Loewe Foundation Craft Prize 2023

Open call  /  Artists   Awards  /  20 Jul 2022  -  25 Oct 2022
Published: 15.09.2022
Open Call. Loewe Foundation Craft Prize 2023.
Loewe Foundation
DEADLINE: 25/10/2022
Loewe Foundation Craft Prize 2023.
Loewe Foundation Craft Prize 2023

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.

Intro
Established as a private cultural Foundation in 1988 by Enrique Loewe Lynch, a fourth-generation member of Loewe’s founding family, today under the direction of his daughter Sheila Loewe, the Foundation continues to promote creativity, educational programmes and to safeguard heritage in the fields of poetry, dance, photography, art and craft. In 2002, the Loewe Foundation was awarded the Gold Medal for Merit in the Fine Arts, the highest honour granted by the Spanish Government. 
The Loewe Foundation launches the sixth edition of the Loewe Foundation Craft Prize, an international award celebrating excellence in craftsmanship.

The Loewe Foundation seeks to recognize uniquely talented artisans whose artistic vision and will to innovate set new standards for the future of craft.

The Prize for the winning entry is 50,000 euros. The shortlisted and winning works will feature in the exhibition and accompanying catalogue in New York in Spring 2023.

The aim of this Prize is to disseminate and raise awareness of the work of talented craftspeople, sharing their greatest achievements. The Loewe Foundation aims to recognise outstanding works that show artistic vision and innovation, and which reflect the personal language and distinct hand of their maker. The Loewe Foundation aims to support artistic craft and acknowledge leading artisans from around the world at the forefront of their fields. The winning work should reinterpret tradition to make it relevant now and demonstrate the continuing valuable contribution to the culture of our time.

Conditions of Entry 
All participants must be professional artisans of 18 years or older at the time of the submission of entries. Entries may be made by an individual or collective (as a ‘group submission’). Businesses and mercantile companies of any kind are excluded. All nationalities are welcome.

Each participant can present either one single piece of work or one series of works, understood as a number of objects considered as a single artistic creation (henceforth, ‘the Work’). This should fall within an area of the applied arts and, as a guide, within the following categories: ceramics, bookbinding, enamelwork, jewellery, lacquer, metal, furniture, leather, textiles, glass, wood, paper, etc. Materials and products outside the categories listed are not excluded; they may be accepted by the Experts Panel if they comply with the aim and requirements of the competition. 

All Works must:
— Be owned by the participant, at all times, since its creation until the end of the License period,
— Be an original one-off piece, handmade or partly handmade by the participant,
— Have been recently created (in the last five years),
— Have won no prizes previously,
— Be innovative, in the sense that it updates tradition,
— Demonstrate artistic intent,
— Be able to travel and be installed by Loewe and/or the Loewe Foundation.

How to participate
Read the Rules of Entry and make sure you comply with all requirements. All participants must be professional artisans 18 years or older. Entries may be made by an individual or collective (as a ‘group submission’). All nationalities are welcome.

>> Link to Rules of Entry 2023.
>> Further details: Loewe Foundation Craft Prize


The Prize for the winning entry is 50,000 euros. The shortlisted and winning works will feature in the exhibition and accompanying catalogue in New York in Spring 2023.


Experts Panel
An Experts Panel will shortlist up to 30 Works from among all the entries submitted. These finalists (hereafter called the ‘Finalists’) will be then submitted to the Jury for their final decision. In this call, the

The Experts Panel will be composed of:
— Paula Aza, LOEWE Director of Architecture and Visual Merchandising.
— Antonia Boström, Director of Collections at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.
— Hyeyoung Cho, Secretary General at the Korea Craft and Design Foundation.
— Andile Dyalvane, ceramist and finalist of the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2022.
— Sara Flynn, ceramicist and finalist of the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2017.
— Myungtaek Jung, furniture artist and finalist of the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2022.
— Wolfgang Lösche, Head of Exhibitions and Fairs at the Chamber of Skilled Trades, Munich
— Juha Marttila, LOEWE Leathergoods Design Director.
— Mary Savig, Curator of Craft at the Smithsonian American Art Museum Renwick Gallery, Washington DC.
— Anatxu Zabalbeascoa (Executive Secretary), architecture and design correspondent for El País.

Jury
The Jury for this call will be made up of:
— Jonathan Anderson, LOEWE Creative Director.
— Naoto Fukasawa, designer and Director of the Japan Folk Crafts Museum, Tokyo.
— Olivier Gabet, Director of the Art Department at the Louvre Museum, Paris.
— Dahye Jeong, winner of the LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize fifth edition.
— Hongnam Kim, Former Director of the National Museum of Korea, Seoul.
— Enrique Loewe, LOEWE FOUNDATION Honorary President.
— Magdalene Odundo, ceramist.
— Wang Shu, architect and Pritzker Prize winner.
— Deyan Sudjic, essayist and Director Emeritus of the Design Museum, London.
— Benedetta Tagliabue, architect and RIBA Stirling Prize winner.
— Abraham Thomas, Curator of Modern Architecture, Design and Decorative Arts at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
— Patricia Urquiola, architect and industrial designer.
— Anatxu Zabalbeascoa (Chairwoman), architecture and design correspondent for El País.
Julia Obermaier. Brooch: Verborgen, 2021. Rock crystal, resin, pigment, stainless steel.. Various dimensions. Awarded at: LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2022. 
. Special Mention Loewe Craft Prize 2022
. 
. Unlike in conventional jewellery pieces where the stone compliments the precious metals that form the structural support, in this piece gemstones have been used to create the entire brooch. Thin slices of gemstone fragments have been layered and overlapped to create sections of contrasting opacity, which are then joined together using colored resin.. Julia Obermaier
Brooch: Verborgen, 2021
Rock crystal, resin, pigment, stainless steel.
Various dimensions
Awarded at: LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2022

Special Mention Loewe Craft Prize 2022

Unlike in conventional jewellery pieces where the stone compliments the precious metals that form the structural support, in this piece gemstones have been used to create the entire brooch. Thin slices of gemstone fragments have been layered and overlapped to create sections of contrasting opacity, which are then joined together using colored resin.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Andile Dyalvane. Vessel: Cornish Wall, 2019. Glazed stoneware clay.. 34 x 34 x 45 cm. Awarded at: LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2022. 
. Special Mention Loewe Craft Prize 2022
. 
. Hand-built using red earthenware coils, this vessel has strong textures that reveal the process of making, including torn ceramic slabs and lines brushed on with a handmade bonsai brush. Carrying a beautiful sense of movement, the work pays homage to both African and British pottery, drawing on Xhosa culture from South Africa and its influence on studio pottery through the work of Bernard Leach. Created during a residency in Cornwall in 2019, the work speaks of a changing natural landscape, of eroding riverbed walls in South Africa, and of the disappearing coastline around St Ives.. Andile Dyalvane
Vessel: Cornish Wall, 2019
Glazed stoneware clay.
34 x 34 x 45 cm
Awarded at: LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2022

Special Mention Loewe Craft Prize 2022

Hand-built using red earthenware coils, this vessel has strong textures that reveal the process of making, including torn ceramic slabs and lines brushed on with a handmade bonsai brush. Carrying a beautiful sense of movement, the work pays homage to both African and British pottery, drawing on Xhosa culture from South Africa and its influence on studio pottery through the work of Bernard Leach. Created during a residency in Cornwall in 2019, the work speaks of a changing natural landscape, of eroding riverbed walls in South Africa, and of the disappearing coastline around St Ives.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
Dahye Jeong. Object: A Time of Sincerity, 2021. Horsehair. 37.5 x 29 x 27 cm. Awarded at: LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2022. Delicate yet solid, this basket is woven out of thin horsehair to create a flexible geometric design that transposes a 500-year-old Korean  Joseon dynasty technique traditionally used in Sabanggwan hat-making and combines it with an ancient earthenware form. Exploiting the natural elasticity of the horsehair fiber, it has been threaded onto a needle and woven into loops to create a work that expresses both the robustness and the beauty of life.. Dahye Jeong
Object: A Time of Sincerity, 2021
Horsehair
37.5 x 29 x 27 cm
Awarded at: LOEWE FOUNDATION Craft Prize 2022
Delicate yet solid, this basket is woven out of thin horsehair to create a flexible geometric design that transposes a 500-year-old Korean  Joseon dynasty technique traditionally used in Sabanggwan hat-making and combines it with an ancient earthenware form. Exploiting the natural elasticity of the horsehair fiber, it has been threaded onto a needle and woven into loops to create a work that expresses both the robustness and the beauty of life.

© By the author. Read Klimt02.net Copyright.
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